Prospective motion correction using tracking coils

Lei Qin, Ehud Schmidt, Zion Tsz Ho Tse, Juan Santos, William S. Hoge, Clare Tempany-Afdhal, Kim Butts-Pauly, Charles L. Dumoulin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Intracavity imaging coils provide higher signal-to-noise than surface coils and have the potential to provide higher spatial resolution in shorter acquisition times. However, images from these coils suffer from physiologically induced motion artifacts, as both the anatomy and the coils move during image acquisition. We developed prospective motion-correction techniques for intracavity imaging using an array of tracking coils. The system had <50 ms latency between tracking and imaging, so that the images from the intracavity coil were acquired in a frame of reference defined by the tracking array rather than by the system's gradient coils. Two-dimensional gradient-recalled and three-dimensional electrocardiogram-gated inversion-recovery-fast-gradient-echo sequences were tested with prospective motion correction using ex vivo hearts placed on a moving platform simulating both respiratory and cardiac motion. Human abdominal tests were subsequently conducted. The tracking array provided a positional accuracy of 0.7 ± 0.5 mm, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm, and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm along the X, Y, and Z directions at a rate of 20 frames-per-second. The ex vivo and human experiments showed significant image quality improvements for both in-plane and through-plane motion correction, which although not performed in intracavity imaging, demonstrates the feasibility of implementing such a motion-correction system in a future design of combined tracking and intracavity coil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-759
Number of pages11
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Quality Improvement
Artifacts
Noise
Anatomy
Electrocardiography
Direction compound

Keywords

  • cardiac MRI
  • intracavity coil imaging
  • prospective motion correction
  • tracking coils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Qin, L., Schmidt, E., Tse, Z. T. H., Santos, J., Hoge, W. S., Tempany-Afdhal, C., ... Dumoulin, C. L. (2013). Prospective motion correction using tracking coils. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 69(3), 749-759. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.24310

Prospective motion correction using tracking coils. / Qin, Lei; Schmidt, Ehud; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Santos, Juan; Hoge, William S.; Tempany-Afdhal, Clare; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Dumoulin, Charles L.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 69, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 749-759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qin, L, Schmidt, E, Tse, ZTH, Santos, J, Hoge, WS, Tempany-Afdhal, C, Butts-Pauly, K & Dumoulin, CL 2013, 'Prospective motion correction using tracking coils', Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 749-759. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.24310
Qin L, Schmidt E, Tse ZTH, Santos J, Hoge WS, Tempany-Afdhal C et al. Prospective motion correction using tracking coils. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2013 Mar 1;69(3):749-759. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.24310
Qin, Lei ; Schmidt, Ehud ; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho ; Santos, Juan ; Hoge, William S. ; Tempany-Afdhal, Clare ; Butts-Pauly, Kim ; Dumoulin, Charles L. / Prospective motion correction using tracking coils. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 749-759.
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