PROSE therapy used to minimize corneal trauma in patients with corneal epithelial defects

Jeanie D. Ling, Anisa Gire, Stephen C. Pflugfelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To review the effectiveness of continuous or extended daily wear of Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem (PROSE) for treating recurrent or persistent corneal epithelial defects from a variety of causes that were refractory to conventional therapy in 9 patients. Design: Retrospective case series. Methods: The medical records of 9 patients with a history of recurrent or persistent corneal epithelial defects resistant to conventional medical treatment who received treatment at the Cullen Eye Institute between January 2011 and July 2012 were reviewed. Demographic information, etiology, prior treatment, and outcome of PROSE treatment were analyzed. Recurrence after cessation of PROSE and complications were also identified. Results: The etiologies of recurrent or persistent corneal epithelial defects in this series included neurotrophic keratopathy, lattice and Avellino dystrophy, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and chemical/thermal injury. All patients were initially treated with bandage contact lens; however, continuous silicone hydrogel lens wear was not effective in preventing recurrence or healing corneal epithelial defects in all patients. Epithelial defects healed without recurrence in all 9 patients treated with PROSE. Eight patients developed recurrent epithelial defects when PROSE was discontinued, but rehealed after resuming PROSE. Visual acuity improved in 8 patients (88.9%) treated with PROSE. Conclusions: Complex persistent or recurrent corneal epithelial defects that failed to heal with extended silicone hydrogel contact lenses healed with PROSE. PROSE therapy was well tolerated, but corneal epithelial defects recurred in all but 1 case following cessation of therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-619.e2
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume155
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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