Propranolol and survival from breast cancer: A pooled analysis of European breast cancer cohorts

Chris R. Cardwell, Anton Pottegård, Evelien Vaes, Hans Garmo, Liam J. Murray, Chris Brown, Pauline A.J. Vissers, Michael O'Rorke, Kala Visvanathan, Deirdre Cronin-Fenton, Harlinde De Schutter, Mats Lambe, Des G. Powe, Myrthe P.P.van Herk-Sukel, Anna Gavin, Søren Friis, Linda Sharp, Kathleen Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. Methods: Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality were available for five and eight cohorts, respectively. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cancer-specific and all-cause mortality by propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use. HRs were pooled across cohorts using meta-analysis techniques. Dose-response analyses by number of prescriptions were also performed. Analyses were repeated investigating propranolol use before cancer diagnosis. Results: The combined study population included 55,252 and 133,251 breast cancer patients in the analysis of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality respectively. Overall, there was no association between propranolol use after diagnosis of breast cancer and breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality (fully adjusted HR = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.77, 1.16 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.93, 1.28, respectively). There was little evidence of a dose-response relationship. There was also no association between propranolol use before breast cancer diagnosis and breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality (fully adjusted HR = 1.03, 95% CI, 0.86, 1.22 and HR = 1.02, 95% CI, 0.94, 1.10, respectively). Similar null associations were observed for non-selective beta-blockers. Conclusions: In this large pooled analysis of breast cancer patients, use of propranolol or non-selective beta-blockers was not associated with improved survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number119
JournalBreast Cancer Research
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Beta-blocker
  • Breast cancer
  • Cohort
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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