Properties of recombinant human N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (hPAO): Potential role in determining drug sensitivity

Yanlin Wang, Amy Hacker, Tracy Murray Stewart, Benjamin Frydman, Aldonia Valasinas, Alison V. Fraser, Patrick M. Woster, Robert A Casero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The recent cloning of the mammalian gene coding for N1- acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO) provides the opportunity to directly examine the role of human PAO (hPAO) in polyamine homeostasis as well as its potential role in determining cellular response to antitumor polyamine analogues. To facilitate the study of this enzyme, the production, purification, and characterization of the recombinant hPAO is reported. hPAO oxidizes N1-acetylspermidine (Km=2.1 μM, Kcat=15.0 s-1) and has very high affinity for N1-acetylspermine (Km=0.85 μM, K cat=31.7 s-1). The recombinant hPAO does not efficiently oxidize spermine, thereby demonstrating a significant difference in substrate specificity from the previously described human spermine oxidase PAOh1/SMO. Importantly, hPAO demonstrates the ability to oxidize a subset of antitumor polyamine analogues, suggesting that this oxidase activity could have a significant effect on determining tumor sensitivity to these or similar agents. Transfection of A549 human lung cancer cells with an hPAO-expressing plasmid leads to a profound decrease in sensitivity to those analogues which act as substrates, confirming its potential to alter drug response. One similarity that hPAO shares with human PAOh1/SMO, is that certain oligoamine analogues are potent inhibitors of its oxidase activity. The results of these studies demonstrate how changes in polyamine catabolism may affect drug response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-90
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Fingerprint

Polyamines
Oxidoreductases
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Spermine
Cloning
Substrates
Purification
Tumors
Plasmids
Genes
Cells
human N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase
Enzymes
Substrate Specificity
Transfection
Organism Cloning
Lung Neoplasms
Cats
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • FAD-dependent
  • HO
  • Polyamines
  • Spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Properties of recombinant human N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (hPAO) : Potential role in determining drug sensitivity. / Wang, Yanlin; Hacker, Amy; Murray Stewart, Tracy; Frydman, Benjamin; Valasinas, Aldonia; Fraser, Alison V.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

In: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, Vol. 56, No. 1, 07.2005, p. 83-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Yanlin ; Hacker, Amy ; Murray Stewart, Tracy ; Frydman, Benjamin ; Valasinas, Aldonia ; Fraser, Alison V. ; Woster, Patrick M. ; Casero, Robert A. / Properties of recombinant human N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (hPAO) : Potential role in determining drug sensitivity. In: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology. 2005 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 83-90.
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