Promoting corporate image or preventing underage use? Analysis of the advertising strategy and expenditures of the JUUL parent education for youth vaping prevention campaign

Ganna Kostygina, Glen Szczypka, Lauren Czaplicki, Mateusz Borowiecki, Roy Ahn, Barbara Schillo, Sherry L. Emery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: In April 2018, JUUL Labs announced a $30 million investment in efforts to combat underage use of its products through 'independent research, youth and parent education and community engagement'. Prior evidence demonstrates that tobacco industry-funded prevention programmes are ineffective and may work against tobacco control efforts; they do not discourage novices and youth from tobacco use but often improve the tobacco industry's public image. We describe the nature, timing of and expenditures related to the JUUL underage use prevention advertisements across media channels. Methods: Expenditures for newspaper, magazine, television, and radio marketing and promotional efforts were collected through Kantar Media's 'Stradegy' dashboard, an online platform which provides counts of advertisement occurrences and expenditures on various media channels. JUUL public relations and corporate social responsibility ads were identified in the Kantar Database. All ad expenditures were extracted and aggregated by date. Analysis of the expenditure data was triangulated with newspaper and industry advertisement archives. Results: Advertisements aired nationally and in over half of all US-designated market areas (n=130) across media platforms including newspapers, magazines, radio, and online in mobile web and internet displays. In 2018, JUUL Labs spent $30 million, predominantly for print advertising. The 'What Parents Need to Know about JUUL' ads primarily advertised JUUL's smoking reduction 'mission' and promoted the product. By 2019, advertising increased to $36.2 million. JUUL's message strategy transitioned to 'Cracking Down on Underage Sales in Retail Stores' and featured adult smoker testimonies, linking JUUL to smoking cessation. Discussion: Marketing expenditures promoting JUUL's corporate social responsibility mission exceeded their $30 million investment in the underage use prevention efforts. The expenditures were focused on the media market areas where health organisation and legislative officials were launching investigations into JUUL social media and other promotional strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number056355
JournalTobacco control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • advertising and promotion
  • media
  • tobacco industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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