Prolongation of allograft and xenograft survival in mice by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies

Kenneth D. Chavin, Henry T. Lau, Jonathan S. Bromberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used to influence graft survival in two transplantation models. Xenogeneic rat islets were transplanted intraportally into mice. Anti-CD2 mAb prolonged xenograft survival and was synergistic with UVB irradiation in prolonging survival. Anti-CD2 mAb was also more potent than an anti-CD4 mAb in this model. Allogeneic cardiac grafts were transplanted across an entire H-2 difference and anti-CD2 mAb prolonged allograft survival in a dose-dependent fashion. Kinetic experiments revealed that anti-CD2 mAb was most potent when administered at the time of allografting. A delay in administration of mAb markedly reduced its immunosuppressive effects. Furthermore, additional doses of mAb given after the initial doses provided no increased immunosuppression and anti-CD2 mAbs did not delay rejection of second-set allografts. These findings support the notion that anti-CD2 mAbs interfere with afferent immunity and that CD2 is most important during the initial steps of an immune response. Investigation of the effect of anti-CD2 mAb on cellular immune functions demonstrated, in agreement with previous results, that it caused antigenic down-modulation of CD2 with relative sparing of CD3, CD4, and CD8 cell surface expression. Concommitantly the MLR, CTL, and NK responses were sup-pressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation
Volume54
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Heterografts
Allografts
Monoclonal Antibodies
Antigenic Modulation
Homologous Transplantation
Graft Survival
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunosuppression
Immunity
Transplantation
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Chavin, K. D., Lau, H. T., & Bromberg, J. S. (1992). Prolongation of allograft and xenograft survival in mice by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies. Transplantation, 54(2), 286-291.

Prolongation of allograft and xenograft survival in mice by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies. / Chavin, Kenneth D.; Lau, Henry T.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 54, No. 2, 1992, p. 286-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chavin, KD, Lau, HT & Bromberg, JS 1992, 'Prolongation of allograft and xenograft survival in mice by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies', Transplantation, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 286-291.
Chavin, Kenneth D. ; Lau, Henry T. ; Bromberg, Jonathan S. / Prolongation of allograft and xenograft survival in mice by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies. In: Transplantation. 1992 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 286-291.
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