Projected impact of polypill use among US adults: Medication use, cardiovascular risk reduction, and side effects

Paul Muntner, Devin Mann, Rachel P. Wildman, Daichi Shimbo, Valentin Fuster, Mark Woodward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Polypills, which include multiple medications for reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a single pill, have been proposed for population-wide use. The number of US adults eligible for polypills and potential benefits are unknown. Methods: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 were analyzed to estimate treatment rates for medications proposed for inclusion in polypills (aspirin, statin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor, and a thiazide-type diuretic for those without and a β-blocker for those with a history of myocardial infarction) among US adults. The number of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events potentially prevented through polypill use was projected by published meta-analyses and 3 large population-based cohort studies. Two polypill eligibility criteria were analyzed: (1) US adults ≥55 years and (2) US adults with a history of CVD. Results: There are 67.6 million US adults ≥55 years and 15.4 million US adults with a history of CVD and, thus, eligible for polypills using the 2 outlined criteria. In 2007 to 2008, 37.3% of US adults ≥55 years and 57.0% of those with a history of CVD were taking statins. Use of other polypill medications was also low. Polypill use by US adults aged ≥55 years is projected to potentially prevent 3.2 million CHD events and 1.7 million strokes over 10 years. Among those with a history of CVD, the potential to prevent of 0.9 million CHD events and 0.5 million strokes is projected. Conclusions: Polypills have the potential to lower CVD incidence substantially among US adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-725
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume161
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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