Prognostic factors and survival for malignant conjunctival melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma over four decades

Nicholas B. Abt, Jiawei Zhao, Yuru Huang, Allen Eghrari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the epidemiology and survival of primary conjunctival malignant neoplasms. Methods: Retrospective analysis of primary malignant conjunctival neoplasms using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1973 to 2012. Results: Of 1661 cases, the most common neoplasms are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)at 54.8% and melanoma at 38.8%. Mean diagnostic age for melanoma was 62.1 compared to 65.5 years for SCC (p = 0.002). 52.2% of melanoma are male versus 77.4% of SCC (p < 0.001). For SCC only age (HR: 1.09, 95% CI:1.04–1.14)is a predictor of survival. For melanoma, age (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.05–1.10), male sex (HR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.16–3.60), T4 tumors (HR: 3.38, 95% CI: 1.17–9.80)and N1 status (HR: 8.69, 95% CI: 2.75–27.42)are all survival predictors. The 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS)estimates are not significantly different between SCC and melanoma, with 70% and 50% respectively for SCC, and 71% and 50% respectively for melanoma. Median survival time is worse for blacks (52 months)compared to whites (118 months)and Asians/Native Americans/Pacific Islanders (145 months), however race was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Five-year survival are similar between decades 1973–1982 (66.2%), 1983–1992 (69.2%), 1993–2002 (71.3%)and 2003–2012 (70.2%). Conclusion: Age at diagnosis is a determinant of survival for both conjunctival SCC and melanoma. Male sex, T4 and N1 staging are also important prognostic factors for melanoma. With respect to overall survival, SCC and melanoma did not differ significantly.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
Conjunctival Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Asian Americans
North American Indians
Neoplasms
Multivariate Analysis
Databases

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Conjunctiva
  • Melanoma
  • Neoplasm
  • Ophthalmology
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Survival
  • Tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{54a4631954f747d198c45f1f32f05654,
title = "Prognostic factors and survival for malignant conjunctival melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma over four decades",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine the epidemiology and survival of primary conjunctival malignant neoplasms. Methods: Retrospective analysis of primary malignant conjunctival neoplasms using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1973 to 2012. Results: Of 1661 cases, the most common neoplasms are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)at 54.8{\%} and melanoma at 38.8{\%}. Mean diagnostic age for melanoma was 62.1 compared to 65.5 years for SCC (p = 0.002). 52.2{\%} of melanoma are male versus 77.4{\%} of SCC (p < 0.001). For SCC only age (HR: 1.09, 95{\%} CI:1.04–1.14)is a predictor of survival. For melanoma, age (HR: 1.07, 95{\%} CI: 1.05–1.10), male sex (HR: 2.04, 95{\%} CI: 1.16–3.60), T4 tumors (HR: 3.38, 95{\%} CI: 1.17–9.80)and N1 status (HR: 8.69, 95{\%} CI: 2.75–27.42)are all survival predictors. The 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS)estimates are not significantly different between SCC and melanoma, with 70{\%} and 50{\%} respectively for SCC, and 71{\%} and 50{\%} respectively for melanoma. Median survival time is worse for blacks (52 months)compared to whites (118 months)and Asians/Native Americans/Pacific Islanders (145 months), however race was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Five-year survival are similar between decades 1973–1982 (66.2{\%}), 1983–1992 (69.2{\%}), 1993–2002 (71.3{\%})and 2003–2012 (70.2{\%}). Conclusion: Age at diagnosis is a determinant of survival for both conjunctival SCC and melanoma. Male sex, T4 and N1 staging are also important prognostic factors for melanoma. With respect to overall survival, SCC and melanoma did not differ significantly.",
keywords = "Cancer, Conjunctiva, Melanoma, Neoplasm, Ophthalmology, Squamous cell carcinoma, Survival, Tumor",
author = "Abt, {Nicholas B.} and Jiawei Zhao and Yuru Huang and Allen Eghrari",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjoto.2019.05.013",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery",
issn = "0196-0709",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prognostic factors and survival for malignant conjunctival melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma over four decades

AU - Abt, Nicholas B.

AU - Zhao, Jiawei

AU - Huang, Yuru

AU - Eghrari, Allen

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To determine the epidemiology and survival of primary conjunctival malignant neoplasms. Methods: Retrospective analysis of primary malignant conjunctival neoplasms using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1973 to 2012. Results: Of 1661 cases, the most common neoplasms are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)at 54.8% and melanoma at 38.8%. Mean diagnostic age for melanoma was 62.1 compared to 65.5 years for SCC (p = 0.002). 52.2% of melanoma are male versus 77.4% of SCC (p < 0.001). For SCC only age (HR: 1.09, 95% CI:1.04–1.14)is a predictor of survival. For melanoma, age (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.05–1.10), male sex (HR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.16–3.60), T4 tumors (HR: 3.38, 95% CI: 1.17–9.80)and N1 status (HR: 8.69, 95% CI: 2.75–27.42)are all survival predictors. The 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS)estimates are not significantly different between SCC and melanoma, with 70% and 50% respectively for SCC, and 71% and 50% respectively for melanoma. Median survival time is worse for blacks (52 months)compared to whites (118 months)and Asians/Native Americans/Pacific Islanders (145 months), however race was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Five-year survival are similar between decades 1973–1982 (66.2%), 1983–1992 (69.2%), 1993–2002 (71.3%)and 2003–2012 (70.2%). Conclusion: Age at diagnosis is a determinant of survival for both conjunctival SCC and melanoma. Male sex, T4 and N1 staging are also important prognostic factors for melanoma. With respect to overall survival, SCC and melanoma did not differ significantly.

AB - Purpose: To determine the epidemiology and survival of primary conjunctival malignant neoplasms. Methods: Retrospective analysis of primary malignant conjunctival neoplasms using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1973 to 2012. Results: Of 1661 cases, the most common neoplasms are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)at 54.8% and melanoma at 38.8%. Mean diagnostic age for melanoma was 62.1 compared to 65.5 years for SCC (p = 0.002). 52.2% of melanoma are male versus 77.4% of SCC (p < 0.001). For SCC only age (HR: 1.09, 95% CI:1.04–1.14)is a predictor of survival. For melanoma, age (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.05–1.10), male sex (HR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.16–3.60), T4 tumors (HR: 3.38, 95% CI: 1.17–9.80)and N1 status (HR: 8.69, 95% CI: 2.75–27.42)are all survival predictors. The 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS)estimates are not significantly different between SCC and melanoma, with 70% and 50% respectively for SCC, and 71% and 50% respectively for melanoma. Median survival time is worse for blacks (52 months)compared to whites (118 months)and Asians/Native Americans/Pacific Islanders (145 months), however race was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Five-year survival are similar between decades 1973–1982 (66.2%), 1983–1992 (69.2%), 1993–2002 (71.3%)and 2003–2012 (70.2%). Conclusion: Age at diagnosis is a determinant of survival for both conjunctival SCC and melanoma. Male sex, T4 and N1 staging are also important prognostic factors for melanoma. With respect to overall survival, SCC and melanoma did not differ significantly.

KW - Cancer

KW - Conjunctiva

KW - Melanoma

KW - Neoplasm

KW - Ophthalmology

KW - Squamous cell carcinoma

KW - Survival

KW - Tumor

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U2 - 10.1016/j.amjoto.2019.05.013

DO - 10.1016/j.amjoto.2019.05.013

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C2 - 31109806

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JO - American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery

JF - American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery

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