Prognostic classification of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: MRI independent component analysis

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Identifying predictors of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) can lead to more accurate diagnosis and facilitate clinical trial participation. We identified 320 participants (93 cognitively normal or CN, 162 MCI, 65 AD) with baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and cognition data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. We used independent component analysis (ICA) on structural MR images to derive 30 matter covariance patterns (ICs) across all participants. These ICs were used in iterative and stepwise discriminant classifier analyses to predict diagnostic classification at 24 months for CN vs. MCI, CN vs. AD, MCI vs. AD, and stable MCI (MCI-S) vs. MCI progression to AD (MCI-P). Models were cross-validated with a "leave-10-out" procedure. For CN vs. MCI, 84.7% accuracy was achieved based on cognitive performance measures, ICs, p-tau181p, and ApoE ε4 status. For CN vs. AD, 94.8% accuracy was achieved based on cognitive performance measures, ICs, and p-tau181p. For MCI vs. AD and MCI-S vs. MCI-P, models achieved 83.1% and 80.3% accuracy, respectively, based on cognitive performance measures, ICs, and p-tau181p. ICA-derived MRI biomarkers achieve excellent diagnostic accuracy for MCI conversion, which is little improved by CSF biomarkers and ApoE ε4 status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-88
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume224
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2014

Keywords

  • AD
  • Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative
  • Data reduction
  • MCI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prognostic classification of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: MRI independent component analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this