Prognosis of Periodic and Rhythmic Patterns in Adult and Pediatric Populations

Dalila W. Lewis, Emily L. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Although electrographic seizures are known to have an outcome on clinical prognosis, the implications of periodic and rhythmic patterns are less clear. The outcomes of adults with these patterns have been reported and are often poor; however, the outcomes in pediatric populations are less well characterized and may be different than in the adult population, as the etiologies of periodic and rhythmic patterns may differ in children and adults. In adults, generalized periodic discharges are highly associated with toxic-metabolic disturbances, infection, and anoxic injury; 30% to 64% of patients have poor outcomes. By contrast, in pediatric patients, generalized periodic discharges are more commonly associated with refractory status epilepticus, with good outcomes in 50% to 77%. The underlying etiology of the periodic or rhythmic pattern has a large influence on overall morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-308
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of clinical neurophysiology : official publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Pediatrics
Status Epilepticus
Poisons
Population
Seizures
Morbidity
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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