Process evaluation results from a school- and community-linked intervention: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG)

D. R. Young, A. Steckler, S. Cohen, C. Pratt, G. Felton, S. G. Moe, J. Pickrel, C. C. Johnson, M. Grieser, L. A. Lytle, J. S. Lee, B. Raburn

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Process evaluation is a component of intervention research that evaluates whether interventions are delivered and received as intended. Here, we describe the process evaluation results for the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) intervention. The intervention consisted of four synergistic components designed to provide supportive school- and community-linked environments to prevent the decline in physical activity in adolescent girls. Process evaluation results indicate that the intervention components were delivered from intervention staff to teachers with high fidelity (84-97%) to the protocol and with lower fidelity (range: 18-93%) from teachers to students. Physical activity programs for girls, a unique feature of the TAAG intervention, increased from a mean of 10 programs per school to a mean of 16 and 15 in years 1 and 2, respectively, in intervention schools, with no change in control schools. These findings suggest that a multicomponent school- and community-based physical activity intervention can be delivered with fidelity and result in a middle school environment that supports physical activity for girls.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)976-986
    Number of pages11
    JournalHealth education research
    Volume23
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 2008

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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