Probing in vivo Mn2+ speciation and oxidative stress resistance in yeast cells with electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy

Rebecca L. McNaughton, Amit R. Reddi, Matthew H S Clement, Ajay Sharma, Kevin Barnese, Leah Rosenfeld, Edith Butler Gralla, Joan Selverstone Valentine, Valeria L Culotta, Brian M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Manganese is an essential transition metal that, among other functions, can act independently of proteins to either defend against or promote oxidative stress and disease. The majority of cellular manganese exists as low molecular-weight Mn2+ complexes, and the balance between opposing "essential" and "toxic" roles is thought to be governed by the nature of the ligands coordinating. Mn2+. Until now, it has been impossible to determine manganese speciation within intact, viable cells, but we here report that this speciation can be probed through measurements of 1H and 31P electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) signal intensities for intracellular Mn2+. Application of this approach to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, and two pairs of yeast mutants genetically engineered to enhance or suppress the accumulation of manganese or phosphates, supports an in vivo role for the orthophosphate complex of Mn2+ in resistance to oxidative stress, thereby corroborating in vitro studies that demonstrated superoxide dismutase activity for this species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15335-15339
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume107
Issue number35
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2010

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Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Manganese
Spectrum Analysis
Oxidative Stress
Yeasts
Poisons
Superoxide Dismutase
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Molecular Weight
Metals
Phosphates
Ligands
Proteins

Keywords

  • ENDOR
  • Phosphate
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • Superoxide dismutase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Probing in vivo Mn2+ speciation and oxidative stress resistance in yeast cells with electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy. / McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Reddi, Amit R.; Clement, Matthew H S; Sharma, Ajay; Barnese, Kevin; Rosenfeld, Leah; Gralla, Edith Butler; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Culotta, Valeria L; Hoffman, Brian M.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 107, No. 35, 31.08.2010, p. 15335-15339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McNaughton, Rebecca L. ; Reddi, Amit R. ; Clement, Matthew H S ; Sharma, Ajay ; Barnese, Kevin ; Rosenfeld, Leah ; Gralla, Edith Butler ; Valentine, Joan Selverstone ; Culotta, Valeria L ; Hoffman, Brian M. / Probing in vivo Mn2+ speciation and oxidative stress resistance in yeast cells with electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2010 ; Vol. 107, No. 35. pp. 15335-15339.
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AU - Barnese, Kevin

AU - Rosenfeld, Leah

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