Prioritizing approaches to engage community members and build trust in biobanks: A survey of attitudes and opinions of adults within outpatient practices at the university of Maryland

Casey Lynnette Overby, Kristin A. Maloney, Tameka De Shawn Alestock, Justin Chavez, David Berman, Reem Maged Sharaf, Tom Fitzgerald, Eun Young Kim, Kathleen Palmer, Alan R. Shuldiner, Braxton D. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Achieving high participation of communities representative of all sub-populations is needed in order to ensure broad applicability of biobank study findings. This study aimed to understand potentially mutable attitudes and opinions commonly correlated with biobank participation in order to inform approaches to promote participation in biobanks. Methods: Adults from two University of Maryland (UMD) Faculty Physicians, Inc. outpatient practices were invited to watch a video and complete a survey about a new biobank initiative. We used: Chi-square to assess the relationship between willingness to join the biobank and participant characteristics, other potentially mutable attitudes and opinions, and trust in the UMD. We also used t-test to assess the relationship with trust in medical research. We also prioritize proposed actions to improve attitudes and opinions about joining biobanks according to perceived responsiveness. Results: 169 participants completed the study, 51% of whom indicated a willingness to join the biobank. Willingness to join the biobank was not associated with age, gender, race, or education but was associated with respondent comfort sharing samples and clinical information, concerns related to confidentiality, potential for misuse of information, trust in UMD, and perceived health benefit. In ranked order, potential actions we surveyed that might alleviate some of these concerns include: increase chances to learn more about the biobank, increase opportunities to be updated, striving to put community concerns first, including involving community members as leaders of biobank research, and involving community members in decision making. Conclusions: This study identified several attitudes and opinions that influence decisions to join a biobank, including many concerns that could potentially be addressed by engaging community members. We also demonstrate our method of prioritizing ways to improve attitudes and opinions about joining a biobank according to perceived responsiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-279
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2015

Keywords

  • Biobank
  • Biorepository
  • Data sharing
  • Preferences
  • Public opinion
  • Research participation
  • Survey
  • Trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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  • Cite this

    Overby, C. L., Maloney, K. A., Alestock, T. D. S., Chavez, J., Berman, D., Sharaf, R. M., Fitzgerald, T., Kim, E. Y., Palmer, K., Shuldiner, A. R., & Mitchell, B. D. (2015). Prioritizing approaches to engage community members and build trust in biobanks: A survey of attitudes and opinions of adults within outpatient practices at the university of Maryland. Journal of Personalized Medicine, 5(3), 264-279. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm5030264