Priorities and trends in the study of proteins in eye research, 1924-2014

Richard D. Semba, Maggie Lam, Kai Sun, Pingbo Zhang, Debra A. Schaumberg, Luigi Ferrucci, Peipei Ping, Jennifer E. Van Eyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To identify the proteins that are relevant to eye research and develop assays for the study of a set of these proteins. Experimental design: We conducted a bibliometric analysis by merging gene lists for human and mouse from the National Center for Biotechnology Information FTP site and combining them with PubMed references that were retrieved with the search terms "eye" [MeSH Terms] OR "eye" [All Fields] OR "eyes" [All Fields]. Results: For human and mouse eye studies, respectively, the total number of publications was 13 525 and 23 895 and the total number of proteins was 4050 and 4717. For proteins in human and mouse eye studies, respectively, 88.7 and 81.7% had five or fewer citations. The top 50 most intensively studied proteins for human and mouse eye studies were generally in the areas of photoreceptors and phototransduction, inflammation, and angiogenesis, neurodevelopment, lens transparency, and cell-cycle and cellular processes. We proposed selected reaction monitoring assays that were developed in silico for the top fifty most intensively studied proteins in human and mouse eye research. Conclusions and clinical relevance: We conclude that scientists engaged in eye research tend to focus on the same proteins. Newer resources and tools in proteomics can expand the investigations to lesser-known proteins of the eye.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1105-1122
Number of pages18
JournalProteomics - Clinical Applications
Volume9
Issue number11-12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • Biological processes
  • Eye
  • Human proteome project
  • MS
  • Mouse
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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