Prior doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment correlates with differences in current patient-provider relationships

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To determine the prevalence of doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment and to examine associations between this shopping and current primary care relationships. Methods In 2012, a national internet-based survey of 600 adults receiving primary care in the past year with a BMI-≥-25 kg/m2 was conducted. Our independent variable was "switching doctors because I felt treated differently because of my weight." Logistic regression models to examine the association of prior doctor shopping with characteristics of current primary care relationships: duration, trust in primary care provider (PCP), and perceived PCP weight-related judgment, adjusted for patient factors were used. Results Overall, 13% of adults with overweight/obesity reported previously doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment. Prior shoppers were more likely to report shorter durations of their current relationships [73% vs. 52%; p-=-0.01] or perceive that their current PCP judged them because of their weight [74% vs. 11%; p-

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1952-1955
Number of pages4
JournalObesity
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Primary Health Care
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Internet
Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Prior doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment correlates with differences in current patient-provider relationships",
abstract = "Objective To determine the prevalence of doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment and to examine associations between this shopping and current primary care relationships. Methods In 2012, a national internet-based survey of 600 adults receiving primary care in the past year with a BMI-≥-25 kg/m2 was conducted. Our independent variable was {"}switching doctors because I felt treated differently because of my weight.{"} Logistic regression models to examine the association of prior doctor shopping with characteristics of current primary care relationships: duration, trust in primary care provider (PCP), and perceived PCP weight-related judgment, adjusted for patient factors were used. Results Overall, 13{\%} of adults with overweight/obesity reported previously doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment. Prior shoppers were more likely to report shorter durations of their current relationships [73{\%} vs. 52{\%}; p-=-0.01] or perceive that their current PCP judged them because of their weight [74{\%} vs. 11{\%}; p-",
author = "Gudzune, {Kimberly A} and Wendy Bennett and Cooper, {Lisa A} and Jeanne Clark and Bleich, {Sara N}",
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doi = "10.1002/oby.20808",
language = "English (US)",
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pages = "1952--1955",
journal = "Obesity",
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AU - Gudzune, Kimberly A

AU - Bennett, Wendy

AU - Cooper, Lisa A

AU - Clark, Jeanne

AU - Bleich, Sara N

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N2 - Objective To determine the prevalence of doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment and to examine associations between this shopping and current primary care relationships. Methods In 2012, a national internet-based survey of 600 adults receiving primary care in the past year with a BMI-≥-25 kg/m2 was conducted. Our independent variable was "switching doctors because I felt treated differently because of my weight." Logistic regression models to examine the association of prior doctor shopping with characteristics of current primary care relationships: duration, trust in primary care provider (PCP), and perceived PCP weight-related judgment, adjusted for patient factors were used. Results Overall, 13% of adults with overweight/obesity reported previously doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment. Prior shoppers were more likely to report shorter durations of their current relationships [73% vs. 52%; p-=-0.01] or perceive that their current PCP judged them because of their weight [74% vs. 11%; p-

AB - Objective To determine the prevalence of doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment and to examine associations between this shopping and current primary care relationships. Methods In 2012, a national internet-based survey of 600 adults receiving primary care in the past year with a BMI-≥-25 kg/m2 was conducted. Our independent variable was "switching doctors because I felt treated differently because of my weight." Logistic regression models to examine the association of prior doctor shopping with characteristics of current primary care relationships: duration, trust in primary care provider (PCP), and perceived PCP weight-related judgment, adjusted for patient factors were used. Results Overall, 13% of adults with overweight/obesity reported previously doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment. Prior shoppers were more likely to report shorter durations of their current relationships [73% vs. 52%; p-=-0.01] or perceive that their current PCP judged them because of their weight [74% vs. 11%; p-

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