Principles for management of orbital fractures in the pediatric population: A cohort study of 150 patients

Devin O'Brien-Coon, Martin Kosztowski, Nicholas Mahoney, Gerhard S. Mundinger, Michael Grant, Richard Redett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Pediatric orbital fractures represent a challenging and sometimes controversial clinical problem. Patients may present with clear indications for surgery, but most require balancing benefits against intraoperative and late complications. The authors assessed these fractures at a state-designated ophthalmology referral center to develop criteria for surgery. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained to retrospectively analyze pediatric trauma registry patients with orbital fracture diagnoses at the Wilmer Eye Institute over 10 years. Patients were excluded if they did not undergo a full ophthalmologic examination, never followed up after their injury, or had significant facial fractures outside of the orbit. Results: One hundred fifty patients met selection criteria; 116 patients (77 percent) completed all follow-up (average, 309 days). Two patients had 20/40 vision or worse at the end of follow-up. One hundred ten patients (71 percent) underwent surgery; 96 underwent acute repair (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1240
Number of pages7
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume137
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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