Primary care, income inequality, and self-rated health in the United States: A mixed-level analysis

L. Shi, B. Starfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using the 1996 Community Tracking Study household survey, the authors examined whether income inequality and primary care, measured at the state level, predict individual morbidity as measured by self-rated health status, while adjusting for potentially confounding individual variables. Their results indicate that distributions of income and primary care within states are significantly associated with individuals' self-rated health; that there is a gradient effect of income inequality on self-rated health; and that individuals living in states with a higher ratio of primary care physician to population are more likely to report good health than those living in states with a lower such ratio. From a policy perspective, improvement in individuals' health is likely to require a multi-pronged approach that addresses individual socioeconomic determinants of health, social and economic policies that affect income distribution, and a strengthening of the primary care aspects of health services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-555
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Health Services
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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