Previously transmitted HIV-1 strains are preferentially selected during subsequent sexual transmissions

Andrew D. Redd, Aleisha N. Collinson-Streng, Nikolaos Chatziandreou, Caroline E. Mullis, Oliver Laeyendecker, Craig Martens, Stacy Ricklefs, Noah Kiwanuka, Phyu Hninn Nyein, Tom Lutalo, Mary K. Grabowski, Xiangrong Kong, Jordyn Manucci, Nelson Sewankambo, Maria J. Wawer, Ronald H. Gray, Stephen F. Porcella, Anthony S. Fauci, Manish Sagar, David SerwaddaThomas C. Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. A genetic bottleneck is known to exist for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at the point of sexual transmission. However, the nature of this bottleneck and its effect on viral diversity over time is unclear. Methods. Interhost and intrahost HIV diversity was analyzed in a stable population in Rakai, Uganda, from 1994 to 2002. HIV-1 envelope sequences from both individuals in initially HIV-discordant relationships in which transmission occurred later were examined using Sanger sequencing of bulk polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products (for 22 couples), clonal analysis (for 3), and next-generation deep sequencing (for 9). Results. Intrahost viral diversity was significantly higher than changes in interhost diversity (P <. 01). The majority of HIV-1-discordant couples examined via bulk PCR (16 of 22 couples), clonal analysis (3 of 3), and next-generation deep sequencing (6 of 9) demonstrated that the viral populations present in the newly infected recipient were more closely related to the donor partner's HIV-1 variants found earlier during infection as compared to those circulating near the estimated time of transmission (P =. 03). Conclusions. These findings suggest that sexual transmission constrains viral diversity at the population level, partially because of the preferential transmission of ancestral as opposed to contemporary strains circulating in the transmitting partner. Future successful vaccine strategies may need to target these transmitted ancestral strains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1433-1442
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume206
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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  • Cite this

    Redd, A. D., Collinson-Streng, A. N., Chatziandreou, N., Mullis, C. E., Laeyendecker, O., Martens, C., Ricklefs, S., Kiwanuka, N., Nyein, P. H., Lutalo, T., Grabowski, M. K., Kong, X., Manucci, J., Sewankambo, N., Wawer, M. J., Gray, R. H., Porcella, S. F., Fauci, A. S., Sagar, M., ... Quinn, T. C. (2012). Previously transmitted HIV-1 strains are preferentially selected during subsequent sexual transmissions. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 206(9), 1433-1442. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jis503