Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in resource-poor countries: Translating research into policy and practice

Kevin M. De Cock, Mary Glenn Fowler, Eric Mercier, Isabelle De Vincenzi, Joseph Saba, Elizabeth Hoff, David J. Alnwick, Martha Rogers, Nathan Shaffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Each year, an estimated 590 000 infants acquire human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection from their mothers, mostly in developing countries that are unable to implement interventions now standard in the industrialized world. In resource-poor settings, the HIV pandemic has eroded hardwon gains in infant and child survival. Recent clinical trial results from international settings suggest that short-course antiretroviral regimens could significantly reduce perinatal HIV transmission worldwide if research findings could be translated into practice. This article reviews current knowledge of mother-to-child HIV transmission in developing countries, summarizes key findings from the trials, outlines future research requirements, and describes public health challenges of implementing perinatal HIV prevention interventions in resource-poor settings. Public health efforts must also emphasize primary prevention strategies to reduce incident HIV infections among adolescents and women of childbearing age. Successful implementation of available perinatal HIV interventions could substantially improve global child survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1175-1182
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume283
Issue number9
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-1
Mothers
Research
Virus Diseases
Developing Countries
Public Health
Survival
Pandemics
Primary Prevention
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in resource-poor countries : Translating research into policy and practice. / De Cock, Kevin M.; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mercier, Eric; De Vincenzi, Isabelle; Saba, Joseph; Hoff, Elizabeth; Alnwick, David J.; Rogers, Martha; Shaffer, Nathan.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 283, No. 9, 01.03.2000, p. 1175-1182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Cock, KM, Fowler, MG, Mercier, E, De Vincenzi, I, Saba, J, Hoff, E, Alnwick, DJ, Rogers, M & Shaffer, N 2000, 'Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in resource-poor countries: Translating research into policy and practice', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 283, no. 9, pp. 1175-1182.
De Cock, Kevin M. ; Fowler, Mary Glenn ; Mercier, Eric ; De Vincenzi, Isabelle ; Saba, Joseph ; Hoff, Elizabeth ; Alnwick, David J. ; Rogers, Martha ; Shaffer, Nathan. / Prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in resource-poor countries : Translating research into policy and practice. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2000 ; Vol. 283, No. 9. pp. 1175-1182.
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