Preventing HIV/AIDS among high-risk urban women: The cost-effectiveness of a behavioral group intervention

David R. Holtgrave, Jeffrey A. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention trial for women at high risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and attending an urban clinic was reported previously. The behavioral group intervention was shown to increase condom use behaviors significantly. This study retrospectively assessed the intervention's cost-effectiveness. Methods. Standard methods of cost and cost-utility analysis were used. Results. The intervention cost was just over $2000 for each quality-adjusted life-year saved; this is favorable compared with other life-saving programs. However, the results are sensitive to changes in some model assumptions. Conclusions. Under most scenarios, the HIV prevention intervention was cost-effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1442-1445
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume86
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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