Preventing bloodstream infections: A measurable national success story in quality improvement

Peter J. Pronovost, Jill A. Marsteller, Christine A. Goeschel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Over the past decade, advances in the quality of care have been slow. One area of success, however, has been in combating central line-associated bloodstream infections. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that the number of patients in US intensive care units suffering a central-line infection declined by 63 percent between 2001 and 2009. We describe the multistep process taken by many stakeholders-states, federal agencies, hospital associations, regulatory and nonprofit associations, clinicians, and local hospitals-to collaborate on the successful reduction and eradication of these infections. Having begun in Michigan, this program has spread to forty-five states, has shown sustained results in reducing hospital-associated infections and mortality, and constitutes an important measurable national success story in quality improvement and a model for improving the health and safety of Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-634
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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