Prevalence of profound laryngeal sensory neuropathy in head and neck cancer survivors with feeding tube-dependent oropharyngeal dysphagia

Omid B. Mehdizadeh, Shumon I. Dhar, Lisa Evangelista, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, Arnaud F. Bewley, Peter C. Belafsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Laryngopharyngeal sensory neuropathy (LSN) has been observed to be a contributing factor to swallowing dysfunction in head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Methods: Retrospective review of 43 tube-dependent HNC survivors was conducted. LSN was assessed with direct palpation of the aryepiglottic fold and by traversing the true vocal folds without eliciting a cough reflex with a flexible laryngoscope. Results: The primary tumor sites were oropharynx (51%), larynx (14%), nasopharynx (4.7%), oral cavity (14%), thyroid (4.7%), unknown primary (9.3%), and esophagus (2.3%). The prevalence of profound LSN was 79.1%. Objective fluoroscopic parameters contributing to swallowing dysfunction were diminished laryngohyoid elevation (100%), pharyngeal weakness (67%), and reduced lateral PES opening (37%). Conclusions: The prevalence of LSN in HNC survivors with feeding tube-dependent dysphagia is high (79.1%). The data suggest that LSN, in addition to fibrosis, pharyngoesophageal stenosis, and cranial nerve motor deficits contributes to swallowing dysfunction in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHead and Neck
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Enteral Nutrition
Deglutition
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Deglutition Disorders
Survivors
Laryngoscopes
Oropharynx
Nasopharynx
Cranial Nerves
Vocal Cords
Palpation
Larynx
Cough
Esophagus
Reflex
Mouth
Thyroid Gland
Pathologic Constriction
Fibrosis
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • dysphagia
  • feeding tube
  • neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Prevalence of profound laryngeal sensory neuropathy in head and neck cancer survivors with feeding tube-dependent oropharyngeal dysphagia. / Mehdizadeh, Omid B.; Dhar, Shumon I.; Evangelista, Lisa; Nativ-Zeltzer, Nogah; Bewley, Arnaud F.; Belafsky, Peter C.

In: Head and Neck, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mehdizadeh, Omid B. ; Dhar, Shumon I. ; Evangelista, Lisa ; Nativ-Zeltzer, Nogah ; Bewley, Arnaud F. ; Belafsky, Peter C. / Prevalence of profound laryngeal sensory neuropathy in head and neck cancer survivors with feeding tube-dependent oropharyngeal dysphagia. In: Head and Neck. 2019.
@article{b0478ad0fb614e3d88b53aa308d5a896,
title = "Prevalence of profound laryngeal sensory neuropathy in head and neck cancer survivors with feeding tube-dependent oropharyngeal dysphagia",
abstract = "Background: Laryngopharyngeal sensory neuropathy (LSN) has been observed to be a contributing factor to swallowing dysfunction in head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Methods: Retrospective review of 43 tube-dependent HNC survivors was conducted. LSN was assessed with direct palpation of the aryepiglottic fold and by traversing the true vocal folds without eliciting a cough reflex with a flexible laryngoscope. Results: The primary tumor sites were oropharynx (51{\%}), larynx (14{\%}), nasopharynx (4.7{\%}), oral cavity (14{\%}), thyroid (4.7{\%}), unknown primary (9.3{\%}), and esophagus (2.3{\%}). The prevalence of profound LSN was 79.1{\%}. Objective fluoroscopic parameters contributing to swallowing dysfunction were diminished laryngohyoid elevation (100{\%}), pharyngeal weakness (67{\%}), and reduced lateral PES opening (37{\%}). Conclusions: The prevalence of LSN in HNC survivors with feeding tube-dependent dysphagia is high (79.1{\%}). The data suggest that LSN, in addition to fibrosis, pharyngoesophageal stenosis, and cranial nerve motor deficits contributes to swallowing dysfunction in these patients.",
keywords = "dysphagia, feeding tube, neuropathy",
author = "Mehdizadeh, {Omid B.} and Dhar, {Shumon I.} and Lisa Evangelista and Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer and Bewley, {Arnaud F.} and Belafsky, {Peter C.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/hed.26059",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "0148-6403",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of profound laryngeal sensory neuropathy in head and neck cancer survivors with feeding tube-dependent oropharyngeal dysphagia

AU - Mehdizadeh, Omid B.

AU - Dhar, Shumon I.

AU - Evangelista, Lisa

AU - Nativ-Zeltzer, Nogah

AU - Bewley, Arnaud F.

AU - Belafsky, Peter C.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Laryngopharyngeal sensory neuropathy (LSN) has been observed to be a contributing factor to swallowing dysfunction in head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Methods: Retrospective review of 43 tube-dependent HNC survivors was conducted. LSN was assessed with direct palpation of the aryepiglottic fold and by traversing the true vocal folds without eliciting a cough reflex with a flexible laryngoscope. Results: The primary tumor sites were oropharynx (51%), larynx (14%), nasopharynx (4.7%), oral cavity (14%), thyroid (4.7%), unknown primary (9.3%), and esophagus (2.3%). The prevalence of profound LSN was 79.1%. Objective fluoroscopic parameters contributing to swallowing dysfunction were diminished laryngohyoid elevation (100%), pharyngeal weakness (67%), and reduced lateral PES opening (37%). Conclusions: The prevalence of LSN in HNC survivors with feeding tube-dependent dysphagia is high (79.1%). The data suggest that LSN, in addition to fibrosis, pharyngoesophageal stenosis, and cranial nerve motor deficits contributes to swallowing dysfunction in these patients.

AB - Background: Laryngopharyngeal sensory neuropathy (LSN) has been observed to be a contributing factor to swallowing dysfunction in head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Methods: Retrospective review of 43 tube-dependent HNC survivors was conducted. LSN was assessed with direct palpation of the aryepiglottic fold and by traversing the true vocal folds without eliciting a cough reflex with a flexible laryngoscope. Results: The primary tumor sites were oropharynx (51%), larynx (14%), nasopharynx (4.7%), oral cavity (14%), thyroid (4.7%), unknown primary (9.3%), and esophagus (2.3%). The prevalence of profound LSN was 79.1%. Objective fluoroscopic parameters contributing to swallowing dysfunction were diminished laryngohyoid elevation (100%), pharyngeal weakness (67%), and reduced lateral PES opening (37%). Conclusions: The prevalence of LSN in HNC survivors with feeding tube-dependent dysphagia is high (79.1%). The data suggest that LSN, in addition to fibrosis, pharyngoesophageal stenosis, and cranial nerve motor deficits contributes to swallowing dysfunction in these patients.

KW - dysphagia

KW - feeding tube

KW - neuropathy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077366371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85077366371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hed.26059

DO - 10.1002/hed.26059

M3 - Article

C2 - 31880375

AN - SCOPUS:85077366371

JO - Head and Neck Surgery

JF - Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 0148-6403

ER -