Prevalence of Migraine Headache in the United States

Relation to Age, Income, Race, and Other Sociodemographic Factors

Walter F. Stewart, Richard B. Lipton, David D Celentano, Michael L. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective.—To describe the magnitude and distribution of the public health problem posed by migraine in the United States by examining migraine prevalence, attack frequency, and attack-related disability by gender, age, race, household income, geographic region, and urban vs rural residence. Design.—In 1989, a self-administered questionnaire was sent to a sample of 15000 households. A designated member of each household initially responded to the questionnaire. Each household member with severe headache was asked to respond to detailed questions about symptoms, frequency, and severity of headaches. Setting.—A sample of households selected from a panel to be representative of the US population in terms of age, gender, household size, and geographic area. Participants.—After a single mailing, 20468 subjects (63.4% response rate) between 12 and 80 years of age responded to the survey. Respondents and non-respondents did not differ by gender, household income, region of the country, or urban vs rural status. Whites and the elderly were more likely to respond. Migraine headache cases were identified on the basis of reported symptoms using established diagnostic criteria. Results.—17.6% of females and 5.7% of males were found to have one or more migraine headaches per year. The prevalence of migraine varied considerably by age and was highest in both men and women between the ages of 35 to 45 years. Migraine prevalence was strongly associated with household income; prevalence in the lowest income group (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-69
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume267
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Migraine Disorders
Headache
Public Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Prevalence of Migraine Headache in the United States : Relation to Age, Income, Race, and Other Sociodemographic Factors. / Stewart, Walter F.; Lipton, Richard B.; Celentano, David D; Reed, Michael L.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 267, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 64-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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