Prevalence of hyperapobetalipoproteinemia and other lipoprotein phenotypes in men (aged ≤50 years) and women (≤60 years) with coronary artery disease

Peter O. Kwiterovich, Josef Coresh, Paul S. Bachorik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The prevalence and clinical characteristics of hyperapobetalipoproteinemia (hyperapoB) and other phenotypes of dyslipoproteinemia were examined in 99 men (aged ≤50 years) and 104 women (≤60 years) undergoing elective diagnostic coronary arteriography. HyperapoB was the most common phenotype (34%) associated with premature coronary artery disease (CAD). Only 20.2% of patients with CAD had a normal lipoprotein phenotype. The significant odds ratios for CAD were as follows: hypertriglyceridemic hyperapoB 17.45 (p < 0.0001), type IV 6.54 (p = 0.0001), type IIa 4.73 (p = 0.008), normotriglyceridemic hyperapoB 2.54 (p = 0.03) and type IIb 8.73 (p = 0.05). The strong association of hypertriglyceridemic hyperapoB with CAD reflected the multiplicative effect of increased low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B and endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, and was independent of the effects of age, sex, diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension, body mass index and cigarette smoking. The ratio of apolipoprotein B to A-1 was better than those of low-density to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at discriminating dyslipidemic phenotypes from normal. Obesity was increased approximately 1.5- to two-fold in the hypertriglyceridemic phenotypes, diabetes was more prevalent in hypertriglyceridemic hyperapoB (6.8-fold; p < 0.001) and type IV (4.4-fold; p = 0.02), and hypertension was increased 1.5- to twofold in most dyslipidemic groups. The data indicate that hyperapoB and endogenous hypertriglyceridemia both contribute to the risk of premature CAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-639
Number of pages9
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume71
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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