Prevalence of honorary coauthorship in the American Journal of Roentgenology

Susanne Bonekamp, Vivek Gowdra Halappa, Celia Corona Villalobos, Margaret Mensa, John Eng, Jonathan S. Lewin, Ihab R Kamel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in articles published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and to evaluate the factors that might influence the perception of honorary authorship. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Corresponding authors of 1333 Original Research articles published in AJR between 2003 and 2010 were invited by e-mail to complete a Web-based, self-administered survey. Univariable analysis of sample proportions was performed using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the independent factors that were associated with the probability of honorary authorship. RESULTS. Responses were received from authors of 490 articles (36.8% response rate). Most respondents were aware of the authorship guidelines proposed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (n = 399, 81.4%) and the issue of honorary authorship (n = 353, 72.0%). Authorship was most commonly decided by the first author (n = 256, 52.2%). One hundred twenty-one authors (24.7%) perceived that one or more coauthors listed for the respective article did not make sufficient contributions. Factors most strongly associated with honorary authorship included a work environment where a senior department member was automatically listed (odds ratio [OR], 1.33), the suggestion that an honorary author should be included (OR, 5.96), and the perception that a coauthor performed only a single nonauthor task (i.e., reviewing the manuscript: OR, 1.54). CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of articles had evidence of honorary authorship. The rate of honorary authors was higher among authors who worked in an environment where senior members were routinely added to all manuscripts submitted for publication, authors who perceived that a coauthor listed had only reviewed the manuscript, and authors who reported that someone suggested they should include an honorary author.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1255
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume198
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Authorship
Manuscripts
Odds Ratio
Logistic Models
Postal Service
Chi-Square Distribution
Publications
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Authorship
  • Ethics
  • Radiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Prevalence of honorary coauthorship in the American Journal of Roentgenology. / Bonekamp, Susanne; Halappa, Vivek Gowdra; Corona Villalobos, Celia; Mensa, Margaret; Eng, John; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Kamel, Ihab R.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 198, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 1247-1255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonekamp, Susanne ; Halappa, Vivek Gowdra ; Corona Villalobos, Celia ; Mensa, Margaret ; Eng, John ; Lewin, Jonathan S. ; Kamel, Ihab R. / Prevalence of honorary coauthorship in the American Journal of Roentgenology. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2012 ; Vol. 198, No. 6. pp. 1247-1255.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in articles published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and to evaluate the factors that might influence the perception of honorary authorship. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Corresponding authors of 1333 Original Research articles published in AJR between 2003 and 2010 were invited by e-mail to complete a Web-based, self-administered survey. Univariable analysis of sample proportions was performed using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the independent factors that were associated with the probability of honorary authorship. RESULTS. Responses were received from authors of 490 articles (36.8{\%} response rate). Most respondents were aware of the authorship guidelines proposed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (n = 399, 81.4{\%}) and the issue of honorary authorship (n = 353, 72.0{\%}). Authorship was most commonly decided by the first author (n = 256, 52.2{\%}). One hundred twenty-one authors (24.7{\%}) perceived that one or more coauthors listed for the respective article did not make sufficient contributions. Factors most strongly associated with honorary authorship included a work environment where a senior department member was automatically listed (odds ratio [OR], 1.33), the suggestion that an honorary author should be included (OR, 5.96), and the perception that a coauthor performed only a single nonauthor task (i.e., reviewing the manuscript: OR, 1.54). CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of articles had evidence of honorary authorship. The rate of honorary authors was higher among authors who worked in an environment where senior members were routinely added to all manuscripts submitted for publication, authors who perceived that a coauthor listed had only reviewed the manuscript, and authors who reported that someone suggested they should include an honorary author.",
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AU - Bonekamp, Susanne

AU - Halappa, Vivek Gowdra

AU - Corona Villalobos, Celia

AU - Mensa, Margaret

AU - Eng, John

AU - Lewin, Jonathan S.

AU - Kamel, Ihab R

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N2 - OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in articles published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and to evaluate the factors that might influence the perception of honorary authorship. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Corresponding authors of 1333 Original Research articles published in AJR between 2003 and 2010 were invited by e-mail to complete a Web-based, self-administered survey. Univariable analysis of sample proportions was performed using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the independent factors that were associated with the probability of honorary authorship. RESULTS. Responses were received from authors of 490 articles (36.8% response rate). Most respondents were aware of the authorship guidelines proposed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (n = 399, 81.4%) and the issue of honorary authorship (n = 353, 72.0%). Authorship was most commonly decided by the first author (n = 256, 52.2%). One hundred twenty-one authors (24.7%) perceived that one or more coauthors listed for the respective article did not make sufficient contributions. Factors most strongly associated with honorary authorship included a work environment where a senior department member was automatically listed (odds ratio [OR], 1.33), the suggestion that an honorary author should be included (OR, 5.96), and the perception that a coauthor performed only a single nonauthor task (i.e., reviewing the manuscript: OR, 1.54). CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of articles had evidence of honorary authorship. The rate of honorary authors was higher among authors who worked in an environment where senior members were routinely added to all manuscripts submitted for publication, authors who perceived that a coauthor listed had only reviewed the manuscript, and authors who reported that someone suggested they should include an honorary author.

AB - OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in articles published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and to evaluate the factors that might influence the perception of honorary authorship. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Corresponding authors of 1333 Original Research articles published in AJR between 2003 and 2010 were invited by e-mail to complete a Web-based, self-administered survey. Univariable analysis of sample proportions was performed using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the independent factors that were associated with the probability of honorary authorship. RESULTS. Responses were received from authors of 490 articles (36.8% response rate). Most respondents were aware of the authorship guidelines proposed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (n = 399, 81.4%) and the issue of honorary authorship (n = 353, 72.0%). Authorship was most commonly decided by the first author (n = 256, 52.2%). One hundred twenty-one authors (24.7%) perceived that one or more coauthors listed for the respective article did not make sufficient contributions. Factors most strongly associated with honorary authorship included a work environment where a senior department member was automatically listed (odds ratio [OR], 1.33), the suggestion that an honorary author should be included (OR, 5.96), and the perception that a coauthor performed only a single nonauthor task (i.e., reviewing the manuscript: OR, 1.54). CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of articles had evidence of honorary authorship. The rate of honorary authors was higher among authors who worked in an environment where senior members were routinely added to all manuscripts submitted for publication, authors who perceived that a coauthor listed had only reviewed the manuscript, and authors who reported that someone suggested they should include an honorary author.

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