Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus markers among hospital employment applicants

W. Robert Lange, Diane Frankenfield, Eileen Weller, Fran Humphrey, Peggy Mooney, Edward J. Bernacki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To delineate baseline seroprevalence rates before job placement, applicants for employment (n = 300) at a large urban medical center were screened for serologic markers to the hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during a 15-week period in 1992. Eighteen applicants (6%) were positive for antibodies to HBV, nine (3%) for HCV, and 3 (1%) for HIV. There was no association by gender for any of these viral markers; however, both HBV and HCV were significantly more often detected in persons applying for hourly positions who were black. In an urban setting, preemployment screening of health care workers for HBV and HCV markers appears warranted, and serum banking for later HIV analysis, should a claim arise, is suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)486-489
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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