Prevalence of functional limitations among foreign and US-born Black older adults: 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys

Manka Nkimbeng, Ruth Alma Turkson-Ocran, Roland J Thorpe, Sarah L Szanton, Joycelyn Cudjoe, Janiece L Taylor, Yvonne Commodore-Mensah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether the prevalence of functional limitations in United States (US) born differs from that of foreign-born Black older adults. Design: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 14,438 US-born and 1583 foreign-born Black older adults (≥50 years) in the 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). Functional limitations were defined by upper and lower extremity limitations, and global functional limitations. Generalized linear modeling using a Poisson distribution and logarithmic link function was used to compare the predicted probabilities of functional limitations in both groups. Results: The mean age (SE) of US-born Blacks was 63.56 (0.12) years and foreign-born Blacks was 62.06 (0.32). The majority (92%) of foreign-born Blacks had resided in the US for ≥10 years. US-born older adults were more likely to have upper (46% vs. 29%, p <.001) and lower (61% vs. 40%, p <.001) extremity limitations than foreign-born Blacks. The prevalence of lower extremity limitations was 22% less in foreign-born Blacks compared to US-born Blacks after adjusting for sociodemographic and health profiles (Prevalence Ratio [PR]: 0.78, 95% CI:0.73–0.84). The adjusted prevalence of upper extremity limitations in foreign-born Blacks was 27% (PR: 0.73, 95% CI: [0.68–0.79]), compared to US-born Black older adults. And that of global functional limitations was 22% less (PR: 0.78, 95% CI [0.73–0.83]) in foreign-born compared to US-born Blacks. Conclusion: Compared to their US-born counterparts, foreign-born Black older adults had a markedly lower prevalence of upper and lower extremity functional limitations. Future comparative studies should examine reasons for this apparent health advantage among foreign-born adults to inform social and medical interventions to prevent functional decline in Black older adults in the US.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Health Surveys
Interviews
interview
health
Lower Extremity
Health
Poisson Distribution
Upper Extremity
Extremities
Cross-Sectional Studies
Group

Keywords

  • Blacks
  • Functional limitations
  • lower extremity limitations
  • older adults
  • upper extremity limitations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{943362dc45e449ce86401e7881b10220,
title = "Prevalence of functional limitations among foreign and US-born Black older adults: 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether the prevalence of functional limitations in United States (US) born differs from that of foreign-born Black older adults. Design: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 14,438 US-born and 1583 foreign-born Black older adults (≥50 years) in the 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). Functional limitations were defined by upper and lower extremity limitations, and global functional limitations. Generalized linear modeling using a Poisson distribution and logarithmic link function was used to compare the predicted probabilities of functional limitations in both groups. Results: The mean age (SE) of US-born Blacks was 63.56 (0.12) years and foreign-born Blacks was 62.06 (0.32). The majority (92{\%}) of foreign-born Blacks had resided in the US for ≥10 years. US-born older adults were more likely to have upper (46{\%} vs. 29{\%}, p <.001) and lower (61{\%} vs. 40{\%}, p <.001) extremity limitations than foreign-born Blacks. The prevalence of lower extremity limitations was 22{\%} less in foreign-born Blacks compared to US-born Blacks after adjusting for sociodemographic and health profiles (Prevalence Ratio [PR]: 0.78, 95{\%} CI:0.73–0.84). The adjusted prevalence of upper extremity limitations in foreign-born Blacks was 27{\%} (PR: 0.73, 95{\%} CI: [0.68–0.79]), compared to US-born Black older adults. And that of global functional limitations was 22{\%} less (PR: 0.78, 95{\%} CI [0.73–0.83]) in foreign-born compared to US-born Blacks. Conclusion: Compared to their US-born counterparts, foreign-born Black older adults had a markedly lower prevalence of upper and lower extremity functional limitations. Future comparative studies should examine reasons for this apparent health advantage among foreign-born adults to inform social and medical interventions to prevent functional decline in Black older adults in the US.",
keywords = "Blacks, Functional limitations, lower extremity limitations, older adults, upper extremity limitations",
author = "Manka Nkimbeng and Turkson-Ocran, {Ruth Alma} and Thorpe, {Roland J} and Szanton, {Sarah L} and Joycelyn Cudjoe and Taylor, {Janiece L} and Yvonne Commodore-Mensah",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1080/13557858.2019.1661357",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Ethnicity and Health",
issn = "1355-7858",
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T1 - Prevalence of functional limitations among foreign and US-born Black older adults

T2 - 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys

AU - Nkimbeng, Manka

AU - Turkson-Ocran, Ruth Alma

AU - Thorpe, Roland J

AU - Szanton, Sarah L

AU - Cudjoe, Joycelyn

AU - Taylor, Janiece L

AU - Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine whether the prevalence of functional limitations in United States (US) born differs from that of foreign-born Black older adults. Design: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 14,438 US-born and 1583 foreign-born Black older adults (≥50 years) in the 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). Functional limitations were defined by upper and lower extremity limitations, and global functional limitations. Generalized linear modeling using a Poisson distribution and logarithmic link function was used to compare the predicted probabilities of functional limitations in both groups. Results: The mean age (SE) of US-born Blacks was 63.56 (0.12) years and foreign-born Blacks was 62.06 (0.32). The majority (92%) of foreign-born Blacks had resided in the US for ≥10 years. US-born older adults were more likely to have upper (46% vs. 29%, p <.001) and lower (61% vs. 40%, p <.001) extremity limitations than foreign-born Blacks. The prevalence of lower extremity limitations was 22% less in foreign-born Blacks compared to US-born Blacks after adjusting for sociodemographic and health profiles (Prevalence Ratio [PR]: 0.78, 95% CI:0.73–0.84). The adjusted prevalence of upper extremity limitations in foreign-born Blacks was 27% (PR: 0.73, 95% CI: [0.68–0.79]), compared to US-born Black older adults. And that of global functional limitations was 22% less (PR: 0.78, 95% CI [0.73–0.83]) in foreign-born compared to US-born Blacks. Conclusion: Compared to their US-born counterparts, foreign-born Black older adults had a markedly lower prevalence of upper and lower extremity functional limitations. Future comparative studies should examine reasons for this apparent health advantage among foreign-born adults to inform social and medical interventions to prevent functional decline in Black older adults in the US.

AB - Objective: To determine whether the prevalence of functional limitations in United States (US) born differs from that of foreign-born Black older adults. Design: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 14,438 US-born and 1583 foreign-born Black older adults (≥50 years) in the 2010–2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). Functional limitations were defined by upper and lower extremity limitations, and global functional limitations. Generalized linear modeling using a Poisson distribution and logarithmic link function was used to compare the predicted probabilities of functional limitations in both groups. Results: The mean age (SE) of US-born Blacks was 63.56 (0.12) years and foreign-born Blacks was 62.06 (0.32). The majority (92%) of foreign-born Blacks had resided in the US for ≥10 years. US-born older adults were more likely to have upper (46% vs. 29%, p <.001) and lower (61% vs. 40%, p <.001) extremity limitations than foreign-born Blacks. The prevalence of lower extremity limitations was 22% less in foreign-born Blacks compared to US-born Blacks after adjusting for sociodemographic and health profiles (Prevalence Ratio [PR]: 0.78, 95% CI:0.73–0.84). The adjusted prevalence of upper extremity limitations in foreign-born Blacks was 27% (PR: 0.73, 95% CI: [0.68–0.79]), compared to US-born Black older adults. And that of global functional limitations was 22% less (PR: 0.78, 95% CI [0.73–0.83]) in foreign-born compared to US-born Blacks. Conclusion: Compared to their US-born counterparts, foreign-born Black older adults had a markedly lower prevalence of upper and lower extremity functional limitations. Future comparative studies should examine reasons for this apparent health advantage among foreign-born adults to inform social and medical interventions to prevent functional decline in Black older adults in the US.

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KW - older adults

KW - upper extremity limitations

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