Prevalence of antidepressant prescription or use in patients with acute coronary syndrome

A systematic review

Matthew Czarny, Erin Arthurs, Diana Frances Coffie, Cheri Smith, Russell J. Steele, Roy Ziegelstein, Brett D. Thombs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Depression is common among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Cardiac side effects of older antidepressants were well-known, but newer antidepressants are generally thought of as safe to use in patients with heart disease. The objective was to assess rates of antidepressant use or prescription to patients within a year of an ACS. Methods: PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases searched through May 29, 2009; manual searching of 33 journals from May 2009 to September 2010. Articles in any language were included if they reported point or period prevalence of antidepressant use or prescription in the 12 months prior or subsequent to an ACS for ≥100 patients. Two investigators independently selected studies for inclusion/exclusion and extracted methodological characteristics and outcomes from included studies (study setting, inclusion/exclusion criteria, sample size, prevalence of antidepressant prescription/use, method of assessing antidepressant prescription/use, time period of assessment). Results: A total of 24 articles were included. The majority were from North America and Europe, and most utilized chart review or self-report to assess antidepressant use or prescription. Although there was substantial heterogeneity in results, overall, rates of antidepressant use or prescription increased from less than 5% prior to 1995 to 10-15% after 2000. In general, studies from North America reported substantially higher rates than studies from Europe, approximately 5% higher among studies that used chart or self-report data. Conclusions: Antidepressant use or prescription has increased considerably, and by 2005 approximately 10% to 15% of ACS patients were prescribed or using one of these drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere27671
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2011

Fingerprint

antidepressants
systematic review
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Antidepressive Agents
Prescriptions
North America
Self Report
heart diseases
PubMed
Sample Size
prognosis
Heart Diseases
Language
adverse effects
Research Personnel
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Depression
drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prevalence of antidepressant prescription or use in patients with acute coronary syndrome : A systematic review. / Czarny, Matthew; Arthurs, Erin; Coffie, Diana Frances; Smith, Cheri; Steele, Russell J.; Ziegelstein, Roy; Thombs, Brett D.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 11, e27671, 22.11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Czarny, Matthew ; Arthurs, Erin ; Coffie, Diana Frances ; Smith, Cheri ; Steele, Russell J. ; Ziegelstein, Roy ; Thombs, Brett D. / Prevalence of antidepressant prescription or use in patients with acute coronary syndrome : A systematic review. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 11.
@article{63fe2eacb05f47139f72b12b87115238,
title = "Prevalence of antidepressant prescription or use in patients with acute coronary syndrome: A systematic review",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: Depression is common among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Cardiac side effects of older antidepressants were well-known, but newer antidepressants are generally thought of as safe to use in patients with heart disease. The objective was to assess rates of antidepressant use or prescription to patients within a year of an ACS. Methods: PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases searched through May 29, 2009; manual searching of 33 journals from May 2009 to September 2010. Articles in any language were included if they reported point or period prevalence of antidepressant use or prescription in the 12 months prior or subsequent to an ACS for ≥100 patients. Two investigators independently selected studies for inclusion/exclusion and extracted methodological characteristics and outcomes from included studies (study setting, inclusion/exclusion criteria, sample size, prevalence of antidepressant prescription/use, method of assessing antidepressant prescription/use, time period of assessment). Results: A total of 24 articles were included. The majority were from North America and Europe, and most utilized chart review or self-report to assess antidepressant use or prescription. Although there was substantial heterogeneity in results, overall, rates of antidepressant use or prescription increased from less than 5{\%} prior to 1995 to 10-15{\%} after 2000. In general, studies from North America reported substantially higher rates than studies from Europe, approximately 5{\%} higher among studies that used chart or self-report data. Conclusions: Antidepressant use or prescription has increased considerably, and by 2005 approximately 10{\%} to 15{\%} of ACS patients were prescribed or using one of these drugs.",
author = "Matthew Czarny and Erin Arthurs and Coffie, {Diana Frances} and Cheri Smith and Steele, {Russell J.} and Roy Ziegelstein and Thombs, {Brett D.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0027671",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of antidepressant prescription or use in patients with acute coronary syndrome

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Czarny, Matthew

AU - Arthurs, Erin

AU - Coffie, Diana Frances

AU - Smith, Cheri

AU - Steele, Russell J.

AU - Ziegelstein, Roy

AU - Thombs, Brett D.

PY - 2011/11/22

Y1 - 2011/11/22

N2 - Background and Objectives: Depression is common among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Cardiac side effects of older antidepressants were well-known, but newer antidepressants are generally thought of as safe to use in patients with heart disease. The objective was to assess rates of antidepressant use or prescription to patients within a year of an ACS. Methods: PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases searched through May 29, 2009; manual searching of 33 journals from May 2009 to September 2010. Articles in any language were included if they reported point or period prevalence of antidepressant use or prescription in the 12 months prior or subsequent to an ACS for ≥100 patients. Two investigators independently selected studies for inclusion/exclusion and extracted methodological characteristics and outcomes from included studies (study setting, inclusion/exclusion criteria, sample size, prevalence of antidepressant prescription/use, method of assessing antidepressant prescription/use, time period of assessment). Results: A total of 24 articles were included. The majority were from North America and Europe, and most utilized chart review or self-report to assess antidepressant use or prescription. Although there was substantial heterogeneity in results, overall, rates of antidepressant use or prescription increased from less than 5% prior to 1995 to 10-15% after 2000. In general, studies from North America reported substantially higher rates than studies from Europe, approximately 5% higher among studies that used chart or self-report data. Conclusions: Antidepressant use or prescription has increased considerably, and by 2005 approximately 10% to 15% of ACS patients were prescribed or using one of these drugs.

AB - Background and Objectives: Depression is common among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Cardiac side effects of older antidepressants were well-known, but newer antidepressants are generally thought of as safe to use in patients with heart disease. The objective was to assess rates of antidepressant use or prescription to patients within a year of an ACS. Methods: PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases searched through May 29, 2009; manual searching of 33 journals from May 2009 to September 2010. Articles in any language were included if they reported point or period prevalence of antidepressant use or prescription in the 12 months prior or subsequent to an ACS for ≥100 patients. Two investigators independently selected studies for inclusion/exclusion and extracted methodological characteristics and outcomes from included studies (study setting, inclusion/exclusion criteria, sample size, prevalence of antidepressant prescription/use, method of assessing antidepressant prescription/use, time period of assessment). Results: A total of 24 articles were included. The majority were from North America and Europe, and most utilized chart review or self-report to assess antidepressant use or prescription. Although there was substantial heterogeneity in results, overall, rates of antidepressant use or prescription increased from less than 5% prior to 1995 to 10-15% after 2000. In general, studies from North America reported substantially higher rates than studies from Europe, approximately 5% higher among studies that used chart or self-report data. Conclusions: Antidepressant use or prescription has increased considerably, and by 2005 approximately 10% to 15% of ACS patients were prescribed or using one of these drugs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81755172382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81755172382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0027671

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0027671

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 11

M1 - e27671

ER -