Prevalence in the United States of selected candidate gene variants

Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1991-1994

Man Huei Chang, Mary Lou Lindegren, Mary A. Butler, Stephen J. Chanock, Nicole F. Dowling, Margaret Gallagher, Ramal Moonesinghe, Cynthia A. Moore, Renée M. Ned, Mary R. Reichler, Christopher L. Sanders, Robert Welch, Ajay Yesupriya, Muin J. Khoury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Population-based allele frequencies and genotype prevalence are important for measuring the contribution of genetic variation to human disease susceptibility, progression, and outcomes. Population-based prevalence estimates also provide the basis for epidemiologic studies of gene-disease associations, for estimating population attributable risk, and for informing health policy and clinical and public health practice. However, such prevalence estimates for genotypes important to public health remain undetermined for the major racial and ethnic groups in the US population. DNA was collected from 7,159 participants aged 12 years or older in Phase 2 (1991-1994) of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Certain age and minority groups were oversampled in this weighted, population-based US survey. Estimates of allele frequency and genotype prevalence for 90 variants in 50 genes chosen for their potential public health significance were calculated by age, sex, and race/ethnicity among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans. These nationally representative data on allele frequency and genotype prevalence provide a valuable resource for future epidemiologic studies in public health in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-66
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume169
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Genotype
Gene Frequency
Public Health
Population
Genes
Epidemiologic Studies
Public Health Practice
Minority Groups
Disease Susceptibility
Health Policy
Ethnic Groups
Disease Progression
Age Groups
DNA

Keywords

  • Alleles
  • Continental population groups
  • Ethnic groups
  • Genetics, population
  • Genotype
  • Nutrition surveys
  • Polymorphism, genetic
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Chang, M. H., Lindegren, M. L., Butler, M. A., Chanock, S. J., Dowling, N. F., Gallagher, M., ... Khoury, M. J. (2009). Prevalence in the United States of selected candidate gene variants: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1991-1994. American Journal of Epidemiology, 169(1), 54-66. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn286

Prevalence in the United States of selected candidate gene variants : Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1991-1994. / Chang, Man Huei; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Butler, Mary A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dowling, Nicole F.; Gallagher, Margaret; Moonesinghe, Ramal; Moore, Cynthia A.; Ned, Renée M.; Reichler, Mary R.; Sanders, Christopher L.; Welch, Robert; Yesupriya, Ajay; Khoury, Muin J.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 169, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 54-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, MH, Lindegren, ML, Butler, MA, Chanock, SJ, Dowling, NF, Gallagher, M, Moonesinghe, R, Moore, CA, Ned, RM, Reichler, MR, Sanders, CL, Welch, R, Yesupriya, A & Khoury, MJ 2009, 'Prevalence in the United States of selected candidate gene variants: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1991-1994', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 169, no. 1, pp. 54-66. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn286
Chang, Man Huei ; Lindegren, Mary Lou ; Butler, Mary A. ; Chanock, Stephen J. ; Dowling, Nicole F. ; Gallagher, Margaret ; Moonesinghe, Ramal ; Moore, Cynthia A. ; Ned, Renée M. ; Reichler, Mary R. ; Sanders, Christopher L. ; Welch, Robert ; Yesupriya, Ajay ; Khoury, Muin J. / Prevalence in the United States of selected candidate gene variants : Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1991-1994. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2009 ; Vol. 169, No. 1. pp. 54-66.
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