Prevalence, harm perceptions, and reasons for using noncombustible tobacco products among current and former smokers

Amanda Richardson, Jennifer Pearson, Haijun Xiao, Carolyn Stalgaitis, Donna Vallone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. We provided estimates of noncombustible tobacco product (electronic nicotine delivery systems [ENDS]; snus; chewing tobacco, dip, or snuff; and dissolvables) use among current and former smokers and examined harm perceptions of noncombustible tobacco products and reasons for their use. Methods. We assessed awareness of, prevalence of, purchase of, harm perceptions of, and reasons for using noncombustible tobacco products among 1487 current and former smokers from 8 US designated market areas. We used adjusted logistic regression to identify correlates of noncombustible tobacco product use. Results. Of the sample, 96% were aware of at least 1 noncombustible tobacco product, but only 33% had used and 21% had purchased one. Noncombustible tobacco product use was associated with being male, non-Hispanic White, younger, and more nicotine dependent. Respondents used noncombustible tobacco products to cut down or quit cigarettes, but only snus was associated with a higher likelihood of making a quit attempt. Users of noncombustible tobacco products, particularly ENDS, were most likely to endorse the product as less harmful than cigarettes. Conclusions. Smokers may use noncombustible tobacco products to cut down or quit smoking. However, noncombustible tobacco product use was not associated with a reduction in cigarettes per day or cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1437-1444
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume104
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence, harm perceptions, and reasons for using noncombustible tobacco products among current and former smokers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this