Prevalence and Significance of Cardiovascular Disease and Hypertension in Elderly Patients With Dementia and Depression

Donald D. Tresch, Marshal F. Folstein, Peter V. Rabins, William R. Hazzard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The prevalence and significance of clinical heart disease and hypertension were compared in three groups of elderly patients. One group was diagnosed as dementia of an Alzheimer's type (AD), another as multiinfarct dementia (MID), and the third as major depression. Clinical heart disease and hypertension were uncommon in the AD group with the prevalence being lower than that reported in most epidemiologic studies. Four percent of the AD patients had a history of myocardial infarction, 5% angina, 1% arrhythmias, and 3% heart failure. Electrocardiographic changes of an old myocardial infarction were present in 9%, atrial fibrillation in 1%, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 3%. A history of hypertension was present in 24% of the AD patients. In comparison, a history of myocardial infarction, angina, and heart failure was five times greater, and electrocardiographic abnormalities were twice as prevalent in the MID group. A history of hypertension was three times more common and actual blood pressure readings were higher. In the depression group heart disease was not uncommon and the prevalence, in general, was comparable with the MID group. However, a history of increased blood pressure and actual increased blood pressure readings were statistically less than in the MID group. (J Am Geriatr Soc 33:530, 1985) 1985 The American Geriatrics Society

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-537
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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