Prevalence and Risk Factors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Older Adults in the Community

Nermin Diab, Natalie R. Daya, Stephen P. Juraschek, Seth Martin, John W. McEvoy, Ulla T. Schultheiß, Anna Köttgen, Elizabeth Selvin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prevalence estimates and evidence informing treatment targets for thyroid dysfunction largely come from studies of middle-aged adults. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to determine the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and risk factors for abnormal thyroid tests in participants aged ≥65 in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (N = 5,392). We measured serum concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid peroxidase antibody (Anti-TPO), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In this population (58% women, 22% black), 17% reported medication use for thyroid dysfunction. Among those not on treatment, the prevalence of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism was 0.82% and 6.06%, respectively. Overt and subclinical hyperthyroidism affected 0.26% and 0.78%, respectively. Multivariable adjusted TSH, FT4 and T3 levels were 25%, 1.3% and 3.9% lower in blacks compared to whites, respectively. Men were less likely to be anti-TPO positive compared to women (p < 0.001). Former and never smoking were associated with lower T3 and FT4 levels compared to current smoking. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in older adults is nearly 25%. Multiple illnesses can interact to contribute to declines in health. Additional attention to thyroid dysfunction and screening in this age group is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 11 2019

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Thyroid Gland
Thyrotropin
Smoking
Iodide Peroxidase
Triiodothyronine
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism
Thyroxine
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Atherosclerosis
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Therapeutics
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Prevalence and Risk Factors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Older Adults in the Community. / Diab, Nermin; Daya, Natalie R.; Juraschek, Stephen P.; Martin, Seth; McEvoy, John W.; Schultheiß, Ulla T.; Köttgen, Anna; Selvin, Elizabeth.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 11.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diab, Nermin ; Daya, Natalie R. ; Juraschek, Stephen P. ; Martin, Seth ; McEvoy, John W. ; Schultheiß, Ulla T. ; Köttgen, Anna ; Selvin, Elizabeth. / Prevalence and Risk Factors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Older Adults in the Community. In: Scientific reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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