Prevalence and patterns of cooking dinner at home in the USA: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008

Senbagam Virudachalam, Judith A. Long, Michael O. Harhay, Daniel E. Polsky, Chris Feudtner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To measure the prevalence of cooking dinner at home in the USA and test whether home dinner preparation habits are associated with socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, country of birth and family structure. Design Cross-sectional analysis. The primary outcome, self-reported frequency of cooking dinner at home, was divided into three categories: 0-1 dinners cooked per week ('never'), 2-5 ('sometimes') and 6-7 ('always'). We used bivariable and multivariable regression analyses to test for associations between frequency of cooking dinner at home and factors of interest. Setting The 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Subjects The sample consisted of 10 149 participants. Results Americans reported cooking an average of five dinners per week; 8 % never, 43 % sometimes and 49 % always cooked dinner at home. Lower household wealth and educational attainment were associated with a higher likelihood of either always or never cooking dinner at home, whereas wealthier, more educated households were more likely to sometimes cook dinner at home (P < 0·05). Black households cooked the fewest dinners at home (mean = 4·4, 95 % CI 4·2, 4·6). Households with foreign-born reference persons cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·8, 95 % CI 5·7, 6·0) than households with US-born reference persons (mean = 4·9, 95 % CI 4·7, 5·1). Households with dependants cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·2, 95 % CI 5·1, 5·4) than households without dependants (mean = 4·6, 95 % CI 4·3, 5·0). Conclusions Home dinner preparation habits varied substantially with socio-economic status and race/ethnicity, associations that likely will have implications for designing and appropriately tailoring interventions to improve home food preparation practices and promote healthy eating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1022-1030
Number of pages9
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Nutrition Surveys
Cooking
Meals
Habits
Economics
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Cookery
  • Home food preparation
  • Obesity
  • Socio-economic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Prevalence and patterns of cooking dinner at home in the USA : National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008. / Virudachalam, Senbagam; Long, Judith A.; Harhay, Michael O.; Polsky, Daniel E.; Feudtner, Chris.

In: Public health nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 1022-1030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Virudachalam, Senbagam ; Long, Judith A. ; Harhay, Michael O. ; Polsky, Daniel E. ; Feudtner, Chris. / Prevalence and patterns of cooking dinner at home in the USA : National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008. In: Public health nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 1022-1030.
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abstract = "Objective To measure the prevalence of cooking dinner at home in the USA and test whether home dinner preparation habits are associated with socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, country of birth and family structure. Design Cross-sectional analysis. The primary outcome, self-reported frequency of cooking dinner at home, was divided into three categories: 0-1 dinners cooked per week ('never'), 2-5 ('sometimes') and 6-7 ('always'). We used bivariable and multivariable regression analyses to test for associations between frequency of cooking dinner at home and factors of interest. Setting The 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Subjects The sample consisted of 10 149 participants. Results Americans reported cooking an average of five dinners per week; 8 {\%} never, 43 {\%} sometimes and 49 {\%} always cooked dinner at home. Lower household wealth and educational attainment were associated with a higher likelihood of either always or never cooking dinner at home, whereas wealthier, more educated households were more likely to sometimes cook dinner at home (P < 0·05). Black households cooked the fewest dinners at home (mean = 4·4, 95 {\%} CI 4·2, 4·6). Households with foreign-born reference persons cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·8, 95 {\%} CI 5·7, 6·0) than households with US-born reference persons (mean = 4·9, 95 {\%} CI 4·7, 5·1). Households with dependants cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·2, 95 {\%} CI 5·1, 5·4) than households without dependants (mean = 4·6, 95 {\%} CI 4·3, 5·0). Conclusions Home dinner preparation habits varied substantially with socio-economic status and race/ethnicity, associations that likely will have implications for designing and appropriately tailoring interventions to improve home food preparation practices and promote healthy eating.",
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T1 - Prevalence and patterns of cooking dinner at home in the USA

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AU - Long, Judith A.

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AU - Polsky, Daniel E.

AU - Feudtner, Chris

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AB - Objective To measure the prevalence of cooking dinner at home in the USA and test whether home dinner preparation habits are associated with socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, country of birth and family structure. Design Cross-sectional analysis. The primary outcome, self-reported frequency of cooking dinner at home, was divided into three categories: 0-1 dinners cooked per week ('never'), 2-5 ('sometimes') and 6-7 ('always'). We used bivariable and multivariable regression analyses to test for associations between frequency of cooking dinner at home and factors of interest. Setting The 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Subjects The sample consisted of 10 149 participants. Results Americans reported cooking an average of five dinners per week; 8 % never, 43 % sometimes and 49 % always cooked dinner at home. Lower household wealth and educational attainment were associated with a higher likelihood of either always or never cooking dinner at home, whereas wealthier, more educated households were more likely to sometimes cook dinner at home (P < 0·05). Black households cooked the fewest dinners at home (mean = 4·4, 95 % CI 4·2, 4·6). Households with foreign-born reference persons cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·8, 95 % CI 5·7, 6·0) than households with US-born reference persons (mean = 4·9, 95 % CI 4·7, 5·1). Households with dependants cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·2, 95 % CI 5·1, 5·4) than households without dependants (mean = 4·6, 95 % CI 4·3, 5·0). Conclusions Home dinner preparation habits varied substantially with socio-economic status and race/ethnicity, associations that likely will have implications for designing and appropriately tailoring interventions to improve home food preparation practices and promote healthy eating.

KW - Cookery

KW - Home food preparation

KW - Obesity

KW - Socio-economic status

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