Prevalence and fate of severe pulmonary hypertension in 559 consecutive patients with severe rheumatic mitral stenosis undergoing mitral balloon valvotomy

Mohamed Eid Fawzy, Walid Hassan, Miltiadis Stefadouros, Mohamed Moursi, Fayez El Shaer, Mohammad A. Chaudhary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aim of the study: The prevalence of severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with severe mitral stenosis (MS) remains unknown, and the long-term effect of mitral balloon valvotomy (MBV) in large numbers of these patients is not well characterized. Methods: Details from the prospective MBV database at the authors' institution relating to 559 consecutive patients who had successful MBV were analyzed. Patients were allocated to three groups on the basis of their pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) at cardiac catheterization immediately before MBV: group A (n = 345) had PASP <50 mmHg; group B (n = 183) had PASP 50-79 mmHg; and group C (n = 31) had PASP ≥80 mmHg. Patients were evaluated clinically and echocardiographically at six months after MBV, and annually thereafter for up to 13 years. Results: No mortality was encountered after MBV. Immediately after MBV, the mean PASP was 38.5 ± 6.8 mmHg in group A (mild PH), 59.0 ± 7.7 mmHg in group B (moderately severe PH), and 97.8 ± 17.0 mmHg in group C (severe PH). At follow up (ca. 4 years), Doppler-monitored PASP fell to normal, and was similar in groups A, B and C (29 ± 8, 31 ± 9, and 29 ± 5 mmHg, respectively; p = NS). Conclusion: MBV was shown to be safe and effective in treating patients with MS and severe PH. The latter condition regressed to normal levels over 6-12 months after successful MBV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)942-948
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Heart Valve Disease
Volume13
Issue number6
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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