Prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances among early-treated HIV-infected persons

Nancy F. Crum-Cianflone, Mollie Poehlman Roediger, David J. Moore, Braden Hale, Amy Weintrob, Anuradha Ganesan, Lynn E. Eberly, Erica Johnson, Brian K. Agan, Scott Letendre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Sleep disturbances are reportedly common among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but recent data, including comparisons with HIV-uninfected persons, are limited. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study among early-treated HIV-infected military beneficiaries (n = 193) to determine the prevalence and factors associated with insomnia (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]). Data were compared with HIV-uninfected persons (n = 50) matched by age, sex, race or ethnicity, and military rank. Results. Forty-six percent of HIV-infected persons had insomnia (PSQI>5), and 30% reported daytime drowsiness (ESS ≥10). The prevalence of insomnia and daytime sleepiness was not significantly higher compared with the HIV-uninfected group (38% [P = .30] and 20% [P = .18], respectively). In the multivariate model, factors associated with insomnia among HIV infected patients included depression (odds ratio [OR], 16.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-142.1; P = .01), increased waist size (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.1; P = .002), and fewer years of education (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, .7-.95; P = .006). Neurocognitive impairment (diagnosed in 19% of HIV-infected participants) was not associated with insomnia; however, HIV-infected persons with insomnia were 3.1-fold more likely to have a decline in activities of daily living than those without insomnia (23% vs 9%; P = .01). Only 18% of HIV-infected persons reported using a sleep medication at least weekly. Conclusions. HIV-infected persons have a high prevalence of insomnia, but among an early-treated cohort this rate was not significantly higher compared with HIV-uninfected persons. Factors associated with insomnia among HIV-infected patients include depression and increased waist size. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances are advocated and may improve quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1485-1494
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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  • Cite this

    Crum-Cianflone, N. F., Roediger, M. P., Moore, D. J., Hale, B., Weintrob, A., Ganesan, A., Eberly, L. E., Johnson, E., Agan, B. K., & Letendre, S. (2012). Prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances among early-treated HIV-infected persons. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 54(10), 1485-1494. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cis192