Prevalence and factors associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in patients attending a Baltimore City Emergency Department

Eshan U. Patel, Melanie A. Frank, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, Richard Rothman, Amy E O Baker, Chadd K. Kraus, Judy Shahan, Charlotte A Gaydos, Gabor D Kelen, Thomas C Quinn, Oliver B. Laeyendecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a common sexually transmitted disease, but there is limited data on its epidemiology among urban populations. The urban Emergency Department (ED) is a potential venue for surveillance as it predominantly serves an inner city minority population. We evaluate the seroprevalence and factors associated with HSV-2 infection among patients attending the Johns Hopkins Hospital Adult Emergency Department (JHH ED). Methods: An identity unlinked-serosurvey was conducted between 6/2007 and 9/2007 in the JHH ED; sera were tested by the Focus HerpeSelect ELISA. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to determine factors associated with HSV-2 infection. Results: Of 3,408 serum samples, 1,853 (54.4%) were seropositive for HSV-2. Females (adjPRR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.38-1.56), non-Hispanic blacks (adjPRR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.82-2.27), single (adjPRR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.25), divorced (adjPRR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.15-1.41), and unemployed patients (adjPRR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21) had significantly higher rates of HSV-2 infection. Though certain zip codes had significantly higher seroprevalence of HSV-2, this effect was completely attenuated when controlling for age and gender. Conclusions: Seroprevalence of HSV-2 in the JHH ED was higher than U.S. national estimates; however, factors associated with HSV-2 infection were similar. The high seroprevalence of HSV-2 in this urban ED highlights the need for targeted testing and treatment. Cross-sectional serosurveys in the urban ED may help to examine the epidemiology of HSV-2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere102422
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 18 2014

Fingerprint

Human herpesvirus 2
Baltimore
Human Herpesvirus 2
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Hospital Emergency Service
infection
Seroepidemiologic Studies
seroprevalence
Epidemiology
epidemiology
sexually transmitted diseases
urban population
Urban Population
Divorce
relative risk
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Serum
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Prevalence and factors associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in patients attending a Baltimore City Emergency Department. / Patel, Eshan U.; Frank, Melanie A.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard; Baker, Amy E O; Kraus, Chadd K.; Shahan, Judy; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Kelen, Gabor D; Quinn, Thomas C; Laeyendecker, Oliver B.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e102422, 18.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4da2afcde15e4577aaed2cbf1cc638b5,
title = "Prevalence and factors associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in patients attending a Baltimore City Emergency Department",
abstract = "Objectives: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a common sexually transmitted disease, but there is limited data on its epidemiology among urban populations. The urban Emergency Department (ED) is a potential venue for surveillance as it predominantly serves an inner city minority population. We evaluate the seroprevalence and factors associated with HSV-2 infection among patients attending the Johns Hopkins Hospital Adult Emergency Department (JHH ED). Methods: An identity unlinked-serosurvey was conducted between 6/2007 and 9/2007 in the JHH ED; sera were tested by the Focus HerpeSelect ELISA. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to determine factors associated with HSV-2 infection. Results: Of 3,408 serum samples, 1,853 (54.4{\%}) were seropositive for HSV-2. Females (adjPRR = 1.47, 95{\%} CI 1.38-1.56), non-Hispanic blacks (adjPRR = 2.03, 95{\%} CI 1.82-2.27), single (adjPRR = 1.15, 95{\%} CI 1.07-1.25), divorced (adjPRR = 1.28, 95{\%} CI 1.15-1.41), and unemployed patients (adjPRR = 1.13, 95{\%} CI 1.05-1.21) had significantly higher rates of HSV-2 infection. Though certain zip codes had significantly higher seroprevalence of HSV-2, this effect was completely attenuated when controlling for age and gender. Conclusions: Seroprevalence of HSV-2 in the JHH ED was higher than U.S. national estimates; however, factors associated with HSV-2 infection were similar. The high seroprevalence of HSV-2 in this urban ED highlights the need for targeted testing and treatment. Cross-sectional serosurveys in the urban ED may help to examine the epidemiology of HSV-2.",
author = "Patel, {Eshan U.} and Frank, {Melanie A.} and Yu-Hsiang Hsieh and Richard Rothman and Baker, {Amy E O} and Kraus, {Chadd K.} and Judy Shahan and Gaydos, {Charlotte A} and Kelen, {Gabor D} and Quinn, {Thomas C} and Laeyendecker, {Oliver B.}",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0102422",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and factors associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in patients attending a Baltimore City Emergency Department

AU - Patel, Eshan U.

AU - Frank, Melanie A.

AU - Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang

AU - Rothman, Richard

AU - Baker, Amy E O

AU - Kraus, Chadd K.

AU - Shahan, Judy

AU - Gaydos, Charlotte A

AU - Kelen, Gabor D

AU - Quinn, Thomas C

AU - Laeyendecker, Oliver B.

PY - 2014/7/18

Y1 - 2014/7/18

N2 - Objectives: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a common sexually transmitted disease, but there is limited data on its epidemiology among urban populations. The urban Emergency Department (ED) is a potential venue for surveillance as it predominantly serves an inner city minority population. We evaluate the seroprevalence and factors associated with HSV-2 infection among patients attending the Johns Hopkins Hospital Adult Emergency Department (JHH ED). Methods: An identity unlinked-serosurvey was conducted between 6/2007 and 9/2007 in the JHH ED; sera were tested by the Focus HerpeSelect ELISA. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to determine factors associated with HSV-2 infection. Results: Of 3,408 serum samples, 1,853 (54.4%) were seropositive for HSV-2. Females (adjPRR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.38-1.56), non-Hispanic blacks (adjPRR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.82-2.27), single (adjPRR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.25), divorced (adjPRR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.15-1.41), and unemployed patients (adjPRR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21) had significantly higher rates of HSV-2 infection. Though certain zip codes had significantly higher seroprevalence of HSV-2, this effect was completely attenuated when controlling for age and gender. Conclusions: Seroprevalence of HSV-2 in the JHH ED was higher than U.S. national estimates; however, factors associated with HSV-2 infection were similar. The high seroprevalence of HSV-2 in this urban ED highlights the need for targeted testing and treatment. Cross-sectional serosurveys in the urban ED may help to examine the epidemiology of HSV-2.

AB - Objectives: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a common sexually transmitted disease, but there is limited data on its epidemiology among urban populations. The urban Emergency Department (ED) is a potential venue for surveillance as it predominantly serves an inner city minority population. We evaluate the seroprevalence and factors associated with HSV-2 infection among patients attending the Johns Hopkins Hospital Adult Emergency Department (JHH ED). Methods: An identity unlinked-serosurvey was conducted between 6/2007 and 9/2007 in the JHH ED; sera were tested by the Focus HerpeSelect ELISA. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to determine factors associated with HSV-2 infection. Results: Of 3,408 serum samples, 1,853 (54.4%) were seropositive for HSV-2. Females (adjPRR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.38-1.56), non-Hispanic blacks (adjPRR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.82-2.27), single (adjPRR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.25), divorced (adjPRR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.15-1.41), and unemployed patients (adjPRR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21) had significantly higher rates of HSV-2 infection. Though certain zip codes had significantly higher seroprevalence of HSV-2, this effect was completely attenuated when controlling for age and gender. Conclusions: Seroprevalence of HSV-2 in the JHH ED was higher than U.S. national estimates; however, factors associated with HSV-2 infection were similar. The high seroprevalence of HSV-2 in this urban ED highlights the need for targeted testing and treatment. Cross-sectional serosurveys in the urban ED may help to examine the epidemiology of HSV-2.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84904575863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84904575863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0102422

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0102422

M3 - Article

C2 - 25036862

AN - SCOPUS:84904575863

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e102422

ER -