Prevalence and correlates of posterior extra echocardiographic spaces in a free-living population based sample (the Framingham study)

Daniel D. Savage, Robert J. Garrison, Frederick Brand, Sandra J. Anderson, William P. Castelli, William B. Kannel, Manning Feinleib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To obtain epidemiologic information on extra echocardiographic spaces immediately posterior to the left ventricular free wall, 2,028 subjects in the original Framingham cohort study (mean age 70 ± 7 years) and 3,624 of the offspring of the cohort (and their spouses) (mean age 44 ± 10 years) with adequate echocardiograms were evaluated. Extra echocardiographic spaces were detected in 370 (6.5%) of the 5,652 subjects. The prevalence ranged from <1 % in subjects in the 20- to 30-year age decade to > 15% for those in their 80s. Extra echocardiographic spaces tended to be more common in subjects who were older, female, obese, more hypertensive, and who had higher blood sugar levels and higher low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (measured 8 years earlier). The high prevalence of extra echocardiographic spaces and the independent association with age (cohort and off-spring), obesity (cohort and male offspring), and ventricular septal hypertrophy (cohort and male offspring) is compatible with at least 2 hypotheses among others that should be tested: (1) Subepicardial fat may often masquerade as pericardial fluid producing a posterior extra echocardiographic space, especially in obese elderly subjects. (2) Small posterior extra echocardiographic spaces may often be early markers of subclinical hypertensive heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1212
Number of pages6
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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