Prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in a community sample

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Abstract

Background: Knowledge of the prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in the community is important for identifying treatment needs and for provision of psychiatric services. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of personality disorders in a community sample and to identify demographic subgroups with especially high prevalence. Method: Clinical psychologists used the International Personality Disorder Examination to assess DSM-IV and ICD-10 personality disorders in a sample of 742 subjects, ages 34-94 years, residing in Baltimore, Maryland. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between demographic characteristics and DSM-IV personality disorder clusters. Results: The estimated overall prevalence of DSM-IV personality disorders was 9%. Cluster A disorders were most prevalent in men who had never married. Cluster B disorders were most prevalent in young men without a high school degree, and cluster C disorders in high school graduates who had never married. Conclusions: Approximately 9% of this community sample has a DSM-IV personality disorder. Personality disorders are over-represented in certain demographic subgroups of the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)536-542
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume180
Issue numberJUNE
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Personality Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Demography
Baltimore
International Classification of Diseases
Psychiatry
Logistic Models
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in a community sample",
abstract = "Background: Knowledge of the prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in the community is important for identifying treatment needs and for provision of psychiatric services. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of personality disorders in a community sample and to identify demographic subgroups with especially high prevalence. Method: Clinical psychologists used the International Personality Disorder Examination to assess DSM-IV and ICD-10 personality disorders in a sample of 742 subjects, ages 34-94 years, residing in Baltimore, Maryland. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between demographic characteristics and DSM-IV personality disorder clusters. Results: The estimated overall prevalence of DSM-IV personality disorders was 9{\%}. Cluster A disorders were most prevalent in men who had never married. Cluster B disorders were most prevalent in young men without a high school degree, and cluster C disorders in high school graduates who had never married. Conclusions: Approximately 9{\%} of this community sample has a DSM-IV personality disorder. Personality disorders are over-represented in certain demographic subgroups of the community.",
author = "Jack Samuels and Eaton, {William W} and Bienvenu, {Oscar J} and Brown, {Clayton H.} and Paul Costa and Gerald Nestadt",
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T1 - Prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in a community sample

AU - Samuels, Jack

AU - Eaton, William W

AU - Bienvenu, Oscar J

AU - Brown, Clayton H.

AU - Costa, Paul

AU - Nestadt, Gerald

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Background: Knowledge of the prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in the community is important for identifying treatment needs and for provision of psychiatric services. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of personality disorders in a community sample and to identify demographic subgroups with especially high prevalence. Method: Clinical psychologists used the International Personality Disorder Examination to assess DSM-IV and ICD-10 personality disorders in a sample of 742 subjects, ages 34-94 years, residing in Baltimore, Maryland. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between demographic characteristics and DSM-IV personality disorder clusters. Results: The estimated overall prevalence of DSM-IV personality disorders was 9%. Cluster A disorders were most prevalent in men who had never married. Cluster B disorders were most prevalent in young men without a high school degree, and cluster C disorders in high school graduates who had never married. Conclusions: Approximately 9% of this community sample has a DSM-IV personality disorder. Personality disorders are over-represented in certain demographic subgroups of the community.

AB - Background: Knowledge of the prevalence and correlates of personality disorders in the community is important for identifying treatment needs and for provision of psychiatric services. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of personality disorders in a community sample and to identify demographic subgroups with especially high prevalence. Method: Clinical psychologists used the International Personality Disorder Examination to assess DSM-IV and ICD-10 personality disorders in a sample of 742 subjects, ages 34-94 years, residing in Baltimore, Maryland. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between demographic characteristics and DSM-IV personality disorder clusters. Results: The estimated overall prevalence of DSM-IV personality disorders was 9%. Cluster A disorders were most prevalent in men who had never married. Cluster B disorders were most prevalent in young men without a high school degree, and cluster C disorders in high school graduates who had never married. Conclusions: Approximately 9% of this community sample has a DSM-IV personality disorder. Personality disorders are over-represented in certain demographic subgroups of the community.

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