Prevalence and correlates of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis knowledge among intrapartum patients and health care providers in Kabul, Afghanistan

C. S. Todd, M. Ahmadzai, F. Atiqzai, J. M. Smith, S. Miller, P. Azfar, H. Siddiqui, S. A.S. Ghazanfar, S. A. Strathdee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Little is known about blood-borne infection awareness and knowledge among obstetric populations and health care providers in Afghanistan. HIV and hepatitis B awareness and knowledge are described among 4452 intrapartum patients completing an interviewer-administered questionnaire and whole-blood rapid testing and 123 obstetric care providers completing a questionnaire between June 2006 and September 2006. Participants were enrolled from three Kabul public maternity hospitals. Most participants were aware of HIV (50.8% of patients and 95.9% of providers) and hepatitis (72.1% of patients and 91.1% of providers). Correct transmission knowledge (defined as naming three correct routes and no incorrect routes) was lower for both groups (HIV: 19.4% for patients and 59.7% for providers; hepatitis B: 1.90% for patients and 33.9% for providers). Correct HIV transmission knowledge among providers was independently associated with level of education (AOR=1.75, 95% CI: 1.20-2.55). While HIV and hepatitis B awareness is common, correct and comprehensive knowledge is not. Continuing education for providers and health communications strategies should address identified knowledge gaps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-117
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Afghanistan
  • Antenatal population
  • Comprehensive HIV knowledge
  • Hepatitis B
  • Provider knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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