Prevalence and correlates of depression among caregivers of children living with HIV in Ghana: findings from the Sankofa pediatric disclosure study

on Behalf of the Sankofa Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior studies show an association between caregiver depression and child health outcomes. There has been little examination of depression among caregivers of HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan countries where pediatric HIV is concentrated. Using baseline data collected in the pediatric HIV disclosure intervention trial, Sankofa, we examined the prevalence and factors associated with depression among caregivers (N = 446) of children infected with HIV in Ghana. Data were analyzed with descriptive and regression analyses. The mean age of the caregivers was 42.2 ± 10.4 years. Eighty percent of the caregivers were female and 59% were HIV-infected. Twenty-eight percent (n = 126) of the caregivers were found to have mild to severe depression. In the adjusted model, factors significantly associated with caregiver depression included: HIV-positive caregiver status (P = 0.04), low income (P = 0.02), lower social support, (P = 0.01), lower HIV knowledge, (P = 0.01), worse HIV illness perceptions (P≤0.001), and greater perceived HIV stigma (P≤0.001). Although we found a high prevalence of depression among our study participants, several of the risks factors identified are modifiable and amenable to interventions that are locally available and affordable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-292
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2019

Keywords

  • Caregiver
  • depression
  • disclosure
  • pediatric HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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