Prevalence and characteristics of employees reporting heavy or problem drinking

Jonathan E. Fielding, Kevin K. Knight, Ronnie Goetzel, Marianne Laouri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction. This study examined the prevalence and demographic characteristics of chronic heavy drinkers, binge drinkers, those who report a problem with alcohol, and those at high risk for alcohol-related problems. Methods. The sample comprised a worksite population of 18,053 employees. The study was based on responses to questions contained in a confidential health profile administered to employees at seven companies by an outside vendor (Johnson & Johnson Health Management, Inc.). Results. Almost 1 in 4 participants (23.0%) was found to be at risk for alcohol-related problems. About 1 in 5 respondents (20.1%) reported binging, 1 in 10 reported chronic heavy drinking (9.8%), and 2.6% reported a drinking problem within the past month. Younger respondents were more likely to report binging but older respondents were more likely to report chronic heavy drinking. Men were more than twice as likely to report binging and almost four times as likely to report chronic heavy drinking, but only one and one-half times as likely to report a drinking problem within the past month. Other differential demographic associations with alternative measures of heavy drinking are described. Conclusion. The results suggest that a health profile administered at the worksite can be an effective screening tool for identifying employees at high risk for alcohol-related problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-327
Number of pages12
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Drinking
Alcohols
Workplace
Health
Demography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prevalence and characteristics of employees reporting heavy or problem drinking. / Fielding, Jonathan E.; Knight, Kevin K.; Goetzel, Ronnie; Laouri, Marianne.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1991, p. 316-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fielding, Jonathan E. ; Knight, Kevin K. ; Goetzel, Ronnie ; Laouri, Marianne. / Prevalence and characteristics of employees reporting heavy or problem drinking. In: Preventive Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 316-327.
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