Presurgical and Postsurgical Opioid Rates in Patients Undergoing Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Kuangshrian Chang, Susan Silva, Maggie Horn, Michael P. Cary, Shawna Schmidt, Victoria M. Goode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the pre- and postsurgical opioid prescription rates and average morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per day in patients undergoing total shoulder replacement (TSR) procedures. Methods: Patients undergoing TSR were identified from the electronic health records (EMR). In addition to patient demographics, opioid prescription 12-months presurgery and postsurgery were recorded. Patients were categorized into two groups: patients with no opioid prescriptions within 12 months before surgery and patients with an opioid prescription after surgery. McNemar tests were conducted to test for significant presurgical to postsurgical changes in opioid rate changes. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to test for significant pre- to postsurgical changes in average MME/day/person, and bivariate logistic regression analyses and covariate-adjusted logistic regressions were used to predict postsurgical opioid prescriptions. Results: Overall, 1,076 patients underwent TSR. More than 900 patients received presurgical opioid prescriptions. There was a significant increase (p = .0015) in pre-surgical to postsurgical prescription rates. Postsurgical opioid prescriptions were 4.6 times more likely to be prescribed to a pre-surgical non-opioid patient than an opioid patient (p < .0001). Among those prescribed an opioid, the median dosage was <50 MME/day and over 82% of patients were at low overdose risk. Patients with comorbidities and without pre-surgical alcohol use were more likely to receive postsurgical opioids. Postsurgical opioid prescriptions were 4.6 times more likely to be prescribed to a presurgical non-opioid patient than an opioid patient (p < .0001). More than 80% of patients undergoing TSR received presurgical opioids. Among those prescribed any opioid, the median dosage was <50 MME/day and greater than 82% of patients were at low overdose risk. Conclusions: Although presurgical non-opioid patients were more likely to receive a postsurgical opioid prescription, based on dosage, most patients were at low risk for an opioid-related overdose or death according to CDC guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPain Management Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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