Presence of pentoxifylline during T cell priming increases clonal frequencies in secondary proliferative responses and inhibits apoptosis

Manisha Gupta, Anna George, Ranjan Sen, Satyajit Rath, Jeannine M. Durdik, Vineeta Bal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Naive T cells appear to be primed by specific Ag to differentiate into either effectors or memory cells. We have been analyzing the factors involved in this differential commitment in the priming of alloresponsive human T cells in vitro and have shown that the presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pentoxifylline (POX), during priming results in a decrease in the primary response and enhancement in the secondary proliferative response. We now show that the POX-mediated effect can be mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP. The secondary response enhancement is due to the effects of POX on the T cells rather than the APCs, because even fixed APCs can prime T cells in the presence of POX. POX affects T cells directly by increasing clonal frequency rather than the burst size of the secondary responders. The known inhibition of IL-2 production by POX is not responsible for this effect, because exogenous IL-2 supplementation does not block it. The presence of POX during priming alters the outcome of T cell activation, resulting in a lower frequency of cells expressing IL-2Rα (CD25) and a decrease in their subsequent apoptosis, and this antiapoptotic effect is consistent with the enhanced commitment of T cells to secondary responsiveness by POX.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-695
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume162
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 15 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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