Prescription drug use and self-prescription among resident physicians

Jason D. Christie, Ilene M. Rosen, Lisa M. Bellini, Thomas Inglesby, Jane Lindsay, Alys Alper, David A. Asch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context. - Self-prescription is common among practicing physicians, but little is known about the practice among resident physicians. Objective. - To determine prescription drug use and self-prescription among US resident physicians. Design and Setting. - Anonymous mail survey of all resident physicians in 4 US categorical internal medicine training programs in February 1997. Main Outcome Measures. - Self-reported use of health care services and prescription medications and how they were obtained. Results. - A total of 316 (83%) of 381 residents responded; 244 residents (78%) reported using at least 1 prescription medicine and 162 residents (52%) reported self-prescribing medications. Twenty-five percent of all medications and 42% of self-prescribed medications were obtained from a sample cabinet; 7% of all medications and 11% of self-prescribed medications were obtained directly from a pharmaceutical company representative. Conclusions. - Self- prescription is common among resident physicians. Although self-prescription is difficult to evaluate, the source of these medications and the lack of oversight of medication use raise questions about the practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1255
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume280
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 1998

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Prescription Drugs
Prescriptions
Physicians
Postal Service
Internal Medicine
Health Services
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Christie, J. D., Rosen, I. M., Bellini, L. M., Inglesby, T., Lindsay, J., Alper, A., & Asch, D. A. (1998). Prescription drug use and self-prescription among resident physicians. Journal of the American Medical Association, 280(14), 1253-1255. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.280.14.1253

Prescription drug use and self-prescription among resident physicians. / Christie, Jason D.; Rosen, Ilene M.; Bellini, Lisa M.; Inglesby, Thomas; Lindsay, Jane; Alper, Alys; Asch, David A.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 280, No. 14, 14.10.1998, p. 1253-1255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christie, JD, Rosen, IM, Bellini, LM, Inglesby, T, Lindsay, J, Alper, A & Asch, DA 1998, 'Prescription drug use and self-prescription among resident physicians', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 280, no. 14, pp. 1253-1255. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.280.14.1253
Christie, Jason D. ; Rosen, Ilene M. ; Bellini, Lisa M. ; Inglesby, Thomas ; Lindsay, Jane ; Alper, Alys ; Asch, David A. / Prescription drug use and self-prescription among resident physicians. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1998 ; Vol. 280, No. 14. pp. 1253-1255.
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