Preoperative contralateral lung radiation dose is associated with postoperative pulmonary toxicity in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with trimodality therapy

Wenji Guo, Xuan Hui, Salem Alfaifi, Lori Anderson, Scott Robertson, Russell Hales, Chen Hu, Todd McNutt, Stephen Broderick, Jarushka Naidoo, Richard Battafarano, Stephen Yang, K. Ranh Voong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo trimodality therapy (chemoradiation followed by surgical resection), it is unknown whether limiting preoperative radiation dose to the uninvolved lung reduces postsurgical morbidity. This study evaluated whether radiation fall-off dose parameters to the contralateral lung that is unaffected by NSCLC are associated with postoperative complications in NSCLC patients treated with trimodality therapy. Methods and materials: We retrospectively reviewed NSCLC patients who underwent trimodality therapy between March 2008 and October 2016, with available restored digital radiation plans. Fischer's exact test was used to assess associations between patient and treatment characteristics and the development of treatment-related toxicity. Spearman rank correlation was used to measure the strength of association between dosimetric parameters. Results: Forty-six patients were identified who received trimodality therapy with intensity modulated radiation (median, 59.4 Gy; range, 45-70) and concurrent platinum doublet chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. The median age was 64.9 years (range, 45.6-81.6). The median follow-up time was 1.9 years (range, 0.3-8.4). Twenty-four (52.2%) patients developed any-grade pulmonary toxicity and 14 (30.4%) patients developed grade 2+ pulmonary toxicity. There was an increased incidence of any-grade pulmonary toxicity in patients with contralateral lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) ≥7% compared with <7% (90%, n = 9 vs 41.7%, n = 15; P =.01). Similarly, contralateral lung V10 ≥20% was associated with an increased rate of any-grade pulmonary toxicity compared with V10 <20% (80%, n = 12 vs 38.7%, n = 12; P =.01). Pneumonectomy/bilobectomy was associated with grade 2+ pulmonary toxicity (P =.04). Conclusions: Patients who received a higher radiation fall-off dose volume parameter (V20 ≥7% and V10 ≥20%) to the contralateral uninvolved lung had a higher incidence of any-grade postoperative pulmonary toxicity. Limiting radiation fall-off dose to the uninvolved lung may be an important modifiable radiation parameter in limiting postoperative toxicity in trimodality patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e239-e248
JournalPractical Radiation Oncology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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