Prenatal exposure to antibiotics, cesarean section and risk of childhood obesity

Noel Mueller, R. Whyatt, L. Hoepner, S. Oberfield, M. G. Dominguez-Bello, E. M. Widen, A. Hassoun, F. Perera, A. Rundle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Objectives:Cesarean section (CS) and antibiotic use during pregnancy may alter normal maternal-offspring microbiota exchange, thereby contributing to aberrant microbial colonization of the infant gut and increased susceptibility to obesity later in life. We hypothesized that (i) maternal use of antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy and (ii) CS are independently associated with higher risk of childhood obesity in the offspring.Subjects/Methods:Of the 727 mothers enrolled in the Northern Manhattan Mothers and Children Study, we analyzed the 436 mother-child dyads followed until 7 years of age with complete data. We ascertained prenatal antibiotic use by a questionnaire administered late in the third trimester, and delivery mode by medical record. We derived age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI) z-scores using the CDC SAS Macro, and defined obesity as BMI z≥95th percentile. We used binary regression with robust variance and linear regression models adjusted for maternal age, ethnicity, pre-gravid BMI, maternal receipt of public assistance, birth weight, sex, breastfeeding in the first year and gestational antibiotics or delivery mode.Results:Compared with children not exposed to antibiotics during the second or third trimester, those exposed had 84% (33-154%) higher risk of obesity, after multivariable adjustment. Second or third trimester antibiotic exposure was also positively associated with BMI z-scores, waist circumference and % body fat (all P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-670
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Pediatric Obesity
Cesarean Section
Mothers
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Linear Models
Public Assistance
Social Adjustment
Pregnancy
Microbiota
Maternal Age
Waist Circumference
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Breast Feeding
Birth Weight
Medical Records
Adipose Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Mueller, N., Whyatt, R., Hoepner, L., Oberfield, S., Dominguez-Bello, M. G., Widen, E. M., ... Rundle, A. (2015). Prenatal exposure to antibiotics, cesarean section and risk of childhood obesity. International Journal of Obesity, 39(4), 665-670. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2014.180

Prenatal exposure to antibiotics, cesarean section and risk of childhood obesity. / Mueller, Noel; Whyatt, R.; Hoepner, L.; Oberfield, S.; Dominguez-Bello, M. G.; Widen, E. M.; Hassoun, A.; Perera, F.; Rundle, A.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 39, No. 4, 09.04.2015, p. 665-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mueller, N, Whyatt, R, Hoepner, L, Oberfield, S, Dominguez-Bello, MG, Widen, EM, Hassoun, A, Perera, F & Rundle, A 2015, 'Prenatal exposure to antibiotics, cesarean section and risk of childhood obesity', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 665-670. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2014.180
Mueller, Noel ; Whyatt, R. ; Hoepner, L. ; Oberfield, S. ; Dominguez-Bello, M. G. ; Widen, E. M. ; Hassoun, A. ; Perera, F. ; Rundle, A. / Prenatal exposure to antibiotics, cesarean section and risk of childhood obesity. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 4. pp. 665-670.
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