Prenatal cardiac function and postnatal cognitive development: An exploratory study

Marc H. Bornstein, Janet Ann DiPietro, Chun Shin Hahn, Kathleen Painter, O. Maurice Haynes, Kathleen A. Costigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fetal cardiac function was measured at 24, 30, and 36 weeks gestation and quantified in terms of heart rate, variability, and episodic accelerations. Children's representational capacity was evaluated at 27 months in terms of language and play. Thirty- and 36-week-old fetuses that displayed greater heart-rate variability and more episodic accelerations, and fetuses that exhibited a more precipitous increase in heart-rate variability and acceleration over gestation achieved higher levels of language competence. Thirty-six-week-old fetuses with higher heart-rate variability and accelerations, and steeper growth trajectories over gestation, achieved higher levels of symbolic play. Cardiac patterning during gestation may reflect an underlying neural substrate that persists through early childhood: Individual variation in rate of development could be stable, or efficient cardiac function could positively influence the underlying neural substrate to enhance cognitive performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-494
Number of pages20
JournalInfancy
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Cognition
Heart Rate
Pregnancy
Fetus
Language
Mental Competency
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Bornstein, M. H., DiPietro, J. A., Hahn, C. S., Painter, K., Haynes, O. M., & Costigan, K. A. (2002). Prenatal cardiac function and postnatal cognitive development: An exploratory study. Infancy, 3(4), 475-494. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327078IN0304_04

Prenatal cardiac function and postnatal cognitive development : An exploratory study. / Bornstein, Marc H.; DiPietro, Janet Ann; Hahn, Chun Shin; Painter, Kathleen; Haynes, O. Maurice; Costigan, Kathleen A.

In: Infancy, Vol. 3, No. 4, 2002, p. 475-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bornstein, MH, DiPietro, JA, Hahn, CS, Painter, K, Haynes, OM & Costigan, KA 2002, 'Prenatal cardiac function and postnatal cognitive development: An exploratory study', Infancy, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 475-494. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327078IN0304_04
Bornstein, Marc H. ; DiPietro, Janet Ann ; Hahn, Chun Shin ; Painter, Kathleen ; Haynes, O. Maurice ; Costigan, Kathleen A. / Prenatal cardiac function and postnatal cognitive development : An exploratory study. In: Infancy. 2002 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 475-494.
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