Premigration exposure to political violence and perpetration of intimate partner violence among immigrant men in Boston

Jhumka Gupta, Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, David Hemenway, Michele R. Decker, Anita Raj, Jay G. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. We examined associations between premigration political violence exposure and past-year intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration among immigrant men attending community health centers in Boston. Methods. A convenience sample of immigrant men (N=379; aged 18-35 years), largely from the Caribbean and Cape Verde, who attend community health centers, completed an anonymous, cross-sectional survey on risk and protective factors for male-perpetrated IPV and respondents' exposure to political violence. Results. One in 5 (20.1%) immigrant men reported that they were exposed to political violence before arrival in the United States. Men reporting political violence exposure were significantly more likely to report IPV perpetration than were men not reporting such exposure (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.41, 5.74). Significant associations with political violence exposure were observed for both physical (AOR=2.69; 95% CI=1.11, 6.54) and sexual (AOR=2.37; 95% CI=1.04, 5.44) IPV perpetration. Conclusions. To our knowledge, our findings document for the first time the significant association between premigration political violence exposure and recent IPV perpetration among immigrant men. Additional work is needed to examine underlying mechanisms to inform culturally appropriate programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)462-469
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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