Premature ventricular beats and coronary heart disease risk factors

Robert M. Kohn, Michel A. Ibrahim, Joseph G. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Kohn, R. M., M. A. Ibrahim and J. G. Feldman (School of Medicine, State Univ. of New York at Buffalo, 14214). Premature ventricular beats and coronary heart disease risk factors. Amer J Epidem 94: 556-563, 1971.-Blood pressure, cholesterol, uric acid, skinfold thickness, ponderal index and a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram were determined for each of 500 white, male fathers of 11th grade pupils. The same determinations, with the exception of electrocardiograms were made on the pupils. Individuals with electrocardiographic evidence of ventricular premature beats had higher levels for each of the six variables tested than either normal individuals or those with premature atrial beats. The combined scores of the six variables for all premature ventricular beat fathers and premature ventricular beat fathers under 50 years of age were significantly higher than for their normal counterparts. The children of fathers with premature ventricular beats had significantly higher values for the six variables combined than did children of normal fathers. It is suggested that premature ventricular beats are associated with certain coronary heart disease risk factors and hence may presage a predisposition to coronary artery disease. The higher level of risk factors among children of fathers with premature ventricular beats suggests that the predisposition to coronary disease may begin at early age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-563
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1971
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coronary disease
  • Electrocardiography
  • Heart
  • Premature atrial beats
  • Premature ventricular beats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Premature ventricular beats and coronary heart disease risk factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this