Preliminary investigation of calcium alginate gel as a biocompatible material for endovascular aneurysm embolization in vivo

Timothy A. Becker, Mark C. Preul, William D. Bichard, Daryl R. Kipke, Cameron McDougall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We sought to expand our assessment of calcium alginate as an embolic agent in an aneurysm model in swine that survived from 30 to 90 days. The objective of this study was to assess the biocompatibility and stability of calcium alginate in aneurysms in vivo. METHODS: Ten models were created from a venous pouch sutured to the carotid artery, simulating flow to a side-wall aneurysm. Eight swine received complete embolizations, and two were less than 50% embolized to be used as controls. Alginate and calcium chloride were injected from concentric-tube microcatheters to form a mass that filled the aneurysm pouch. RESULTS: Angiography and histology verified complete aneurysm occlusion and neck healing up to 90 days in eight swine. Both control animal aneurysms ruptured within 8 days. No animals showed evidence of downstream calcium alginate gel propagation. A minor bioactive response to the alginate gel was noted at 30 days, and fibrous tissue grew over the aneurysm orifice, sealing off the defect. No degenerative or inflammatory response was observed. At 90 days, moderate fibrous tissue surrounded the alginate. Tissue growth across the aneurysm neck remained complete and stable with no signs of neointimal growth into the parent vessel. CONCLUSION: Calcium alginate was an effective endovascular occlusion material that filled the aneurysm and provided an effective template for tissue growth across the aneurysm neck after 30 days and up to 90 days. Complete filling of the aneurysm with calcium alginate ensures stability, biocompatibility, and optimal healing for up to 90 days in swine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1127
Number of pages9
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biocompatible Materials
Aneurysm
Gels
Swine
Growth
alginic acid
Calcium Chloride
Ruptured Aneurysm
Carotid Arteries
Histology
Angiography
Neck

Keywords

  • Aneurysm
  • Calcium alginate
  • Embolization
  • Endovascular occlusion
  • Hydrogel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Preliminary investigation of calcium alginate gel as a biocompatible material for endovascular aneurysm embolization in vivo. / Becker, Timothy A.; Preul, Mark C.; Bichard, William D.; Kipke, Daryl R.; McDougall, Cameron.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 60, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 1119-1127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Becker, Timothy A. ; Preul, Mark C. ; Bichard, William D. ; Kipke, Daryl R. ; McDougall, Cameron. / Preliminary investigation of calcium alginate gel as a biocompatible material for endovascular aneurysm embolization in vivo. In: Neurosurgery. 2007 ; Vol. 60, No. 6. pp. 1119-1127.
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